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A Basic Lifting Skill Review: Grip Strength

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Tue, 12/11/2018 - 15:31
Every seasoned lifter appreciates how easy it is to lose simple habits in pursuit of getting stronger. One such habit: Getting a good grip.
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12 Items for the New Garage Gym Owner

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Tue, 12/11/2018 - 11:12
Tired of the commercial gym? Maybe it's time to start up your own gym in the garage. Not sure where to start? Look no further than this 12-item list.
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Simplify your Strength Programming Using Die-Rolled Variability

https://www.strongfirst.com/blog/ - Tue, 12/11/2018 - 06:00

What is the best plan for any strength or fitness goal? It’s the one that you will consistently follow. A reasonable program done consistently will deliver better results than a masterminded one that you can’t stick to. Simplifying your programming gives you more time to focus on the doing. 

Author Arryn Grogan shares his simple and effective method to determine your workload for a session and/or a week—using a 6-sided die—whether you’re planning grinds or ballistics. He finds it useful in long-term goal planning, and also when he doesn’t want to spend too much mental energy trying to mastermind the “perfect” program. This method allows you to set your parameters and get to work.

StrongFirst-Die-Roll-Variability-Programming

There are many great programs out there: Simple & Sinister, Soju and Tuba, Rite of Passage, Strong Endurance, Plan Strong, Program Minimum [Squared]. I could keep going. Some are very structured and regimented, while others have a little more give. The common theme between these and many more is that they’ve all been tested and thoughtfully prepared.

I’ve been training with kettlebells, and in general, since mid-2012 when I first read Enter the Kettlebell. I ordered a 16kg kettlebell along with the book and haven’t looked back since. Many out there are much stronger than me, but I take pride in the strength I’ve earned these past years.

Like others, I’ve experienced ups and downs in my life. However, strength training has been constant ever since I first picked up that one-pood bell. I credit several reasons why I’ve been able to consistently train over the years and not get burnt out or injured: discovering a purpose to be strong, striving for skill proficiency before increasing the weights lifted, absorbing information, testing (and sticking to) a program and reflecting on it, etc. But mostly, it’s because I understand and implement two of StrongFirst’s key programming components: 1) continuity of the training process and 2) waving the loads. To sum it up: continue doing the same thing, but do it a little differently over time.

The Road to my 2017 Goals—60kg Bent Press and Turkish Get-up

I formulated my plan—basing a day’s intensity on a die roll. I assigned an intensity to each die face, starting with my heaviest weight, and worked backward. Since my 1RM was around 50kg for both lifts, I chose 48kg as my top intensity and assigned it to the highest possible die roll, a six—then five = 40kg, four or three = 32kg, two = 24kg, and one = 16kg. Note the double odds to train with my middle intensity.

Each day I would roll the die, take the assigned weight, and do the planned reps. I rolled again if the die roll was the same as the previous one, to avoid repeating the same work two days in a row. I progressed intuitively, and when I felt ready, added a set or another rep. I worked at each set or rep progression for about a month, not rushing to add volume or intensity to my 4-5 weekly practice sessions. I tried to make the daily workload as easy as possible (though, not all days were, based on stress or time). I eventually reached the point (48kg x 3) where I knew I could make the 60kg lift. I did it on my first try for both lifts.

StrongFirst-Arryn-Bentpress

This was my first, loosely structured iteration using this method. While achieving my goals, I gained valuable insight on how to outline it for someone else to follow. Here, resulting from my learning experience, is a simple format for a structured-but-yielding program you can use to improve either your grinds or ballistics performance.

Simple Programming for Grinds and Ballistics Rules for Grinds
  • Start with a baseline: 1RM, 5RM, etc.
  • Choose your heaviest weight (die roll 6), ideally a 2 or 3RM, and work backward assigning weights for each die face.
  • Practice sessions: 3-6 times per week.
  • Roll the die every session. Do not repeat the same die roll from session to session.
  • Double your chances of rolling the middle intensity.
  • Your daily number of lifts (NL) or total reps will be Σ10-20 (per side for single-sided grinds), including your warm-up. Note that Σ is the Greek symbol for sum, meaning the total repetitions will equal this number.
  • Your heaviest weight (die roll 6) should be between 3-5 TOTAL reps. For each lighter weight, add 3-5 reps to the previous weight’s number of lifts. Leave a rep or two “in the tank” (don’t do five reps with your 5RM).
  • Vary the reps to get to your total NL (Pistol Squat w/24kg x Σ14—so do: 4, 3, 4, 3 for example).
  • Remember, “lift heavy, not hard.”
  • If you’re starting to feel very strong, take a couple of easy days (maybe even off). Then, after your preferred warm-up, test for either a 1RM or a repetition maximum with your previous 3 or 5RM weight.
Sample Pull-up (Grind) Program (excludes warm-up sets)

Die-Roll-Variability-Grinds

Rules for Ballistics
  • Choose a baseline: Rep count for TSC snatch test, a weight you cannot yet swing 100 times in 5 minutes for Simple & Sinister, etc.
  • Keep the weight the same for the length of the training block.
  • Roll the die once per week. Do not repeat the same die roll from week to week.
  • Your number of lifts (NL) for a four-week block will be between 720 and 1,800.
  • Plan your higher-volume days when you feel strongest during your week.
  • You’ll need a clock or an interval timer—you’ll perform a set at the top of each minute on most days.
  • One set is 10 repetitions on one side.
  • Train for four weeks and test on week 5, or for eight weeks and test on week 9.
  • If your NL on a day is 100 or more, do one set per minute. Otherwise, use the “talk test” to determine when to start the next set.
  • Do no other ballistics training.
  • Plan your weeks around events in your life: choose, don’t roll, a low NL if you know you’re traveling for a holiday weekend, for example.
Sample 1-Arm Swing (Ballistic) Program

StrongFirst-Die-Roll-Ballistic-Day4

This example ballistics program was an integral part of Iron Maiden Holly Myers’ training to achieve the Sinister challenge. She incorporated the die-rolled variability for swings alongside Easy Strength programming for bench press and front squats.

StongFirst-1arm-Heavy-Swing-Holly

I think, for most people (myself included), finding the program that allows us to consistently train, free of injury, is superior to any one “workout” or an exhausting “Six Weeks to ‘This’ or ‘That’.”

So get yourself a die and give it a try. Let us know what you think in the comments or in our StrongFirst online forum.

The post Simplify your Strength Programming Using Die-Rolled Variability appeared first on StrongFirst.

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December Random Post

http://bretcontreras.com/feed/ - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 22:53

Happy Holidays fitness friends!

I wanted to share two podcasts, a new blog post, and the Instagram content that I’ve been cranking out over the past couple of weeks. I hope you enjoy!

In my latest BLOG POST, I talk about my experience with only performing three lifts (hip thrust, leg extension, and leg curls) and how they allowed me to maintain my deadlift and squat strength. You can see the video HERE.

The Fitness Devil Podcast

In THIS podcast, we talked about my journey to opening up Glute Lab, gym etiquette, and how I handle the criticism I receive in this industry.

Barbell Shrugged Podcast

First thing’s first. I did not come up with the title. I would not have approved of it if they ran it by me, but they didn’t. If you listen to the podcast, you’ll realize that this was not the gist of my talk and that there are some excellent nuggets of wisdom to glean. I used to write for TNation back in the day, but stopped because they’d pull this clickbait crap on me and change the names of my titles to controversial ones that would rile people up. But I digress. In THIS podcast, you’ll learn why my empowerment model is far more effective than the dependency model that pervades the rehabilitation industry. Quit labeling people as dysfunctional!

Here are some of my most popular recent Instagram posts:

View this post on Instagram

In working with over 200 bikini competitors in the past year, one thing that fascinates me is the varying types of approaches to prep. Different physique coaches have different methods, yet each can lead to a pleasing result on stage. ⁣ ⁣ Nevertheless, there are many misconceptions associated with bulking and cutting. There’s a belief that when bulking, you should do less training volume and perform more compound exercises with heavier weight for lower rep ranges with longer rest periods and stick to the basics. In contrast, when cutting, many believe that you should perform more single-joint exercises with less weight for higher reps with shorter rest periods and include more variety.⁣ ⁣ These notions are false. There will be some differences in training, but for the most part, the only needed changes are dietary. You’ll need to reduce calories in a prep. Some research indicates that you should slightly elevate your relative protein intake, and cardio might increase depending on the rate of progression. I’ve trained several high level competitors who did zero cardio during prep and ended up looking their all-time best – even some who competed on the Olympia stage. ⁣ ⁣ If you’ve been training hard consistently for a long time, your strength levels will indeed change. Absolute strength on common barbell lifts will drop, whereas relative strength on common bodyweight exercises will increase. You probably won’t be setting any squat or hip thrust PRs, but you’ll become a boss on chin-ups. ⁣ ⁣ What builds muscle best in a surplus maintains muscle best in a deficit. In other words, you can use the same exact training strategies to bulk or to cut.⁣ ⁣ #gluteguy #glutelab

A post shared by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) on Oct 23, 2018 at 2:53pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

One of the most annoying aspects of my job involves trying to convince people that “advanced” routines aren’t necessarily better than “basic” routines. Trust me – if I wanted to razzle and dazzle anyone, I easily could. There’s no one more skilled than me at coming up with crazy variations, dropsets, different tempos, supersets, and burnouts. However, the basics form the foundation of every good program. ⁣ ⁣ The routine shown at the bottom of the graphic is an amazing lower body workout for anyone. If you think that this workout is too “basic” for you, then quite frankly, you don’t know what you’re doing in the gym. Yes, it’s “only” 12 sets, but if you know how to push yourself and you’ve built up your strength, it will crush you. Doing squats, deadlifts, and hip thrusts in the same workout is very demanding. Getting stronger at these lifts will build your entire lower body. ⁣ ⁣ The problem is, many lifters have not mastered the art of pushing themselves to failure, they don’t understand how to properly implement progressive overload, and they over-value variety and novelty. When I write programs for people, I have a goal in mind. If I write you something like what’s shown in the bottom workout, it’s because I want you to build your compound bilateral strength. If your coach prescribes you something similar, don’t second-guess him or her. ⁣(The top workout is also great… don’t get me wrong.) ⁣ Last year, my client @mahsa_ifbbpro could have done the bottom workout with 405 lbs for 3 sets of 8 on the hip thrust, 185 lbs for 3 sets of 6 on the back squat, 205 lbs for 3 sets of 10 on the stiff leg deadlift, and 130lbs for 3 sets of 20 on the seated hip abduction machine. If she did a similar workout 3 times per week, this amounts to 36 high quality sets for the glutes. Her glutes are massive!⁣ ⁣ The bottom line: every exercise and method has its place, but never underestimate “the basics”. ⁣ ⁣ Maybe YOU need to be more “basic” if you want to see results. ⁣ ⁣ #gluteguy #glutelab

A post shared by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) on Oct 25, 2018 at 8:35pm PDT

View this post on Instagram

In high school, I was so sick and tired of being so skinny that I vowed to change it. I gained 70 lbs in 2 years by stuffing my face all day long. My nightly dinners consisted of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, Ramen noodles, and a bowl of cereal. My dad would make my sandwich sometimes and I’d scold him for not loading it up to the max with peanut butter. Turns out I was consuming a thousand calories from the PB & J sandwich alone. This was great for bulking, but it’s the worst thing you can do if you’re cutting. The pic on the left contains 21 grams of peanut butter whereas the pic on the right contains 121 grams. This amounts to a difference of 563 calories! Most of you are trying to lose weight. If so, you’d be foolish to just wing your portion sizes like me. The vast majority of people consume many more calories than they think. This has been shown to be the case in several well-conducted studies. People swear they don’t eat that much, but when they actually weigh and track, they realize that they were grossly underestimating their actual intake – often by 40% or more. They assume they’re consuming 1,500 cals per day but it’s really more like 3,000. Bottom line: take the time to understand portion sizes per type of food you’re consuming. Also if you hip thrust then peanut butter ends up going straight to the glutes

Exercise of the Week: Quadruped 1-arm Trap Raise to Swimmer Hover

https://ericcressey.com/blog - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 17:55

I recently started implementing the quadruped 1-arm trap raise to swimmer hover with some of our baseball guys, and it’s quickly become one of my favorites.

This drill addresses several important needs in a throwing population:

1. scapular posterior tilt

2. scapular upward rotation

3. tissue extensibility of the long head of the triceps and lat

4. the quadruped (all fours) position really reaffirms the good convex-concave relationship between the scapula and rib cage

You should not feel this at all in the front or top of the shoulder. Rather, the movement should be felt in the lower traps (mid back) and serratus anterior (add a full exhale at the top of each rep to intensify that activation). Some individuals will feel a good stretch through the triceps.

To learn more about how we assess, program, and coach at the shoulder girdle, be sure to check out Sturdy Shoulder Solutions.

Sign-up Today for our FREE Newsletter and receive a four-part video series on how to deadlift!

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Fun Core Exercises for Young Athletes – Erica Suter

http://iyca.org/feed/ - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 15:55

“Okay kids, it’s time for core work!” says the team coach.

After these words are uttered, young athletes might sigh in frustration or dread the countless reps of Sit-Ups ahead.  It’s like they’ve been programmed to expect core training to be boring and difficult.  

While I am not totally against Sit-Ups, we must ask ourselves as youth coaches, ‘what am I trying to accomplish?’ when programming core exercises. Moreover, ‘how am I helping these young athletes become more resilient for their sport?’

Core training must be approached in a multi-faceted manner, which takes more than just instructing kids to do countless Sit-Ups. Since the core encompasses muscle groups beyond the “six pack abs,” all muscles must be attacked when programming core exercises for kids, so we are improving their performance in sports, and reducing the chance of injuries.

Think of the core as the foundation of an athlete’s body – it allows kids to maintain balance, transfer force, sprint with clean mechanics, and perform sport specific actions with power. Multiple muscle groups must be activated in order for these actions to be optimized.

In soccer, for example, if a kid wants a stronger shot, the core must stabilize the spine in order to for the hips to work efficiently, then rotate correctly so there is enough power produced when the ball is struck. Not only will the core produce power, but it needs to stabilize the spine in order to minimize the stress on the low back. More core stability, then, equals less low back compensation for many sport-specific actions.

With that said, core training must ensure kids are strengthening all of the muscles that wrap around the torso, from the hip extensors, to hip flexors, to the anterior core muscles, to the internal and external obliques.

While core training may be difficult, it can also be enjoyable. Eventually, Sit-Ups may prove too easy for kids, or perhaps too monotonous. To that end, kids enjoy challenges. Kids enjoy variety. Kids enjoy games. Kids enjoy the novelty of new exercises.

Here are four fun core exercises you can do with your youth athletes (and get creative with):

1. Resistance Band Chaos Dead Bug

The Dead Bug is an excellent exercise for anterior core activation as well as stability through the lumbo-pelvic region. Once athletes master the conventional Dead Bug, here is a fun, yet challenging partner variation to try:

Perform 2-3 sets, 15-30 seconds.

2. Chaos Ball Dead Bug

This is another way to add more external “chaos” to the Dead Bug. The more force your partner applies to the ball, the more it ups the ante. Youth athletes love this one because they have fun challenging their partner.

Perform 2-3 sets, 15-30 seconds.

3. Bird Dog High Fives

The Bird Dog is a stellar movement for contralateral coordination, as well as anterior core and gluteal activation. However, sometimes, the conventional Bird Dog can become too easy as well as monotonous. Here is a fun game to try to spice up the Bird Dog movement:

Perform 2-3 sets, 6-8 reps each side.

4. Pull-Up Hold

The Pull-Up Hold is not only an excellent upper body strength exercise but also a difficult anterior core and gluteal exercise. Being able to maintain full body tension by squeezing the glutes and bracing the core is extremely challenging, and will help kids to build serious strength. To make this drill more fun, I like to do Pull-Up Hold Battles and have two athletes face off on who can hold the Pull-Up the longest.


Perform 2-3 sets, for as many seconds as possible.

So which one will you give a whirl first?

I promise your youth athletes will be inspired by the challenges these exercise present, as well as look forward to performing them. Additionally, they will feel stronger, more resilient, and more confident to play their sport. Fun, yet challenging core exercises that work all the muscles in the torso and hone stability are a win-win.

Erica Suter is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and soccer performance coach at JDyer Strength and Conditioning in Baltimore, Maryland. She works with youth athletes across the state of Maryland in the areas of strength, conditioning, agility, and technical soccer training. Besides coaching, she is a passionate writer, and writes on youth fitness as well as soccer performance training on her blog www.ericasuter.com. She also is the creator of the Total Youth Soccer Fitness Program, which is a comprehensive guide for coaches and parents on how to train youth soccer players both safely and effectively. Her mission is to inspire a love for movement and play in kids, and motivate them to stay active for a lifetime.

Connect with her here:
Instagram
Twitter
Website

The post Fun Core Exercises for Young Athletes – Erica Suter appeared first on IYCA - The International Youth Conditioning Association.

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Plant Protein Paradox

http://www.tonygentilcore.com/feed/ - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 13:34

It was a pleasant surprise to have an email waiting for me this morning from Dr. Mike T. Nelson asking if I’d be interesting in posting this article up on my website?

“Does He-Man give zero shits about rocking a bowl cut?”

Of course I’d be interested.

The animal protein vs. plant-based protein debate is alive and well. Thankfully we have smart, sane, and subjective researchers in the field like Dr. Nelson to hand us the facts so we can make more informed decisions.

Enjoy!

Copyright: yelenayemchuk / 123RF Stock Photo

Plant Protein Paradox

Plant proteins are all the rage now, but should you drop all your meat consumption to save the planet at the expense of your biceps? Is there any data to prop up the idea that eating more plants helps the earth?

Hang on to your propeller hat for a short trip down the nerd chute to see if the environmental concerns have weight and how plant proteins stack up.

I don’t trust thez gunZ to plants only

Plant proteins have become more popular recently in part due to environmental concerns or ethical concerns (1, 2).  Environmental research is not my main wheelhouse, however I can read research.

Pimentel et al. in 2003 (3) analyzed the of land and energy resources devoted to an average meat-based diet compared with a lactoovovegetarian (plant-based) diet. Both diets contained the same number of calories at 3,533 kcal per person.   According to their analysis:

“The meat-based food system requires more energy, land, and water resources than the lactoovovegetarian diet. In this limited sense, the lactoovovegetarian diet is more sustainable than the average American meat-based diet.” (3).

Meat-eaters = do not pass Go and collect 200 colones (about 33 cents).

In the USA, Europe and Australia, meat and dairy provide about 80% of the daily protein intake compared to Africa where as little as 7 g of meat and 4 g of milk are consumed per capita (4).

I hear your biceps shrieking in terror from here.

In an analysis from Scarborough et al., in 2014 (1), the researchers found that greenhouse gas emission in self-selected meat-eaters was about twice as high as those in vegans. They concluded that reductions in meat consumption could lead to reductions in green house gas emissions.

Meat-eaters 0, plant people 2.

Editor’s note: Tony here, if you want to know my true thoughts on kale, go HERE.

While the above around two selections, a reduction in the consumption of meat proteins may provide an advantage for the environment; but can they provide the same physiologic response in MPS (muscle protein synthesis – aka stuffing those amino acids into your muscles to make them bigger and stronger)?

Will Tony’s biceps become baby biceps?

Science Bitches

A study by Yang et al. (5) compared the effects of whey and soy protein in older men (age 71 +/- 5 years). The subjects completed a single-leg extension exercise before taking either no protein (eeeek) or 20 grams of soy protein (sorry gonads).

The researchers sampled the men’s muscle tissue via biopsy to compare the results to the non-exercising leg. They found that consuming soy protein was better than nothing, but it did not match to the response of whey protein from previous studies (6).

Your friendly author here with Dr Jose Antonio

In another study (7), wheat protein was compared to dairy protein sources in healthy older men (average age: 71 ± 1 years old).

The subjects (n=60) were split into 5 groups where they consumed 35 g wheat protein, 35 g wheat protein hydrolysate, 35 g micellar casein, 35 g whey protein, or 60 g wheat protein hydrolysate.

Plasma and muscle samples were collected at regular intervals. They found that a 60-gram dose of wheat protein was needed to see the same MPS response as the lower dose of 35 grams of the dairy based proteins (7).

Take Away?

Even if you are using a wheat protein supplement, you need a piss ton of it to match the same acute muscle building effects as dairy based proteins. Only trying to get that much wheat via whole food sources bro?

Good luck and enjoy the masseter hypertrophy along with lower body mobility from the Wilford Brimley two-step time.

He does look like a cat  

Photo Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/methodshop/2756721978

Chronic Data

I hear the Pubmed ninjas rising up from their war-torn keyboards in their Mom’s basement in a unionism cry:

“…but that is all acute data Mr. PhD Sciency pants – don’t you know that you need chronic data?”

In a chronic study from Joy et al (8), subjects were given either 48 grams of rice protein as a supplement or 48 grams of whey protein isolate after exercise. They did not see any difference between groups over 8 weeks at that dose (8).

This study provides data that while plant proteins tend to be inferior to dairy based proteins on a gram-for-gram basis, that difference in MPS can be equalized at a higher intake dose.

Summary (AKA: Too Long, Did Not Read)

In short, there is data that eating less meat may be better for Mother Earth.

Good news – if you are eating a plant protein you can up the dose (amount) to get similar effects as your meat based bro-tein consuming doooooode bro buddies with bulging biceps.

The downside is that it takes many larger serving sizes.

In the end, it is up to each person to decide their own cost/ benefits, but now you can make an informed decision without watching your biceps wither in the process.

About the Author

Mike T. Nelson, PhD, MSME, CSCS, CISSN, is a research fanatic who specializes in metabolic flexibility and heart rate variability, as well as an online trainer, adjunct professor, faculty member at the Carrick Institute, presenter, creator of the Flex Diet Cert, kiteboarder, and (somewhat incongruously) heavy-metal enthusiast.

You can find out more about him at his website at www.miketnelson.com

References (AKA: Pubmed Ninja Garlic)
  1. Scarborough P, Appleby PN, Mizdrak A, Briggs AD, Travis RC, Bradbury KE, et al. Dietary greenhouse gas emissions of meat-eaters, fish-eaters, vegetarians and vegans in the UK. Climatic change. 2014;125(2):179-92.
  2. Millward DJ, Garnett T. Plenary Lecture 3: Food and the planet: nutritional dilemmas of greenhouse gas emission reductions through reduced intakes of meat and dairy foods. The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2010;69(1):103-18.
  3. Pimentel D, Pimentel M. Sustainability of meat-based and plant-based diets and the environment. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(3 Suppl):660s-3s.
  4. Gorissen SHM, Witard OC. Characterising the muscle anabolic potential of dairy, meat and plant-based protein sources in older adults. The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society. 2018;77(1):20-31.
  5. Yang Y, Churchward-Venne TA, Burd NA, Breen L, Tarnopolsky MA, Phillips SM. Myofibrillar protein synthesis following ingestion of soy protein isolate at rest and after resistance exercise in elderly men. Nutr Metab (Lond). 2012;9(1):57.
  6. Tang JE, Moore DR, Kujbida GW, Tarnopolsky MA, Phillips SM. Ingestion of whey hydrolysate, casein, or soy protein isolate: effects on mixed muscle protein synthesis at rest and following resistance exercise in young men. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2009;107(3):987-92.
  7. Gorissen SH, Horstman AM, Franssen R, Crombag JJ, Langer H, Bierau J, et al. Ingestion of Wheat Protein Increases In Vivo Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates in Healthy Older Men in a Randomized Trial. The Journal of nutrition. 2016;146(9):1651-9.
  8. Joy JM, Lowery RP, Wilson JM, Purpura M, De Souza EO, Wilson SM, et al. The effects of 8 weeks of whey or rice protein supplementation on body composition and exercise performance. Nutrition journal. 2013;12:86.

The post Plant Protein Paradox appeared first on Tony Gentilcore.

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How to Keep Clients Longer

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 10:57
I’ve owned a gym for 13 years, and I've coached for 22. Throughout the years, I learned it’s easier to keep a client than to get a new one.
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Top 5 for November

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 10:03
Sifting through November, here's the listing of what ranked at the top (in terms of popularity). And speaking of lists... stumped in finding the perfect gift for a loved one infatuated with lifting weights? Oh then, keep reading.
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The 8-Week Hip Thrust / Leg Extension / Nordic Ham Curl Experiment

http://bretcontreras.com/feed/ - Mon, 12/10/2018 - 01:17

Update: I wrote this blogpost a month ago, but someone hacked my blog so I couldn’t post it. Over the past four weeks since performing this experiment, I’ve gone on to tie numerous squat and deadlift records despite just performing 1-2 hard sets of them per week and I’m still pain free.

Squats and deadlifts have been my bread and butter lifts for as long as I can remember. But over the past couple of years, I’ve felt myself getting beat down from them. My knees (especially my right one) were dodgy, and my low back was feeling beat up more often than not.

For this reason, I decided to embark on an experiment. Having realized that the smith machine allowed me to hip thrust pain-free and recently having received the Glute Drive, which also feels good on my knees, I wanted to see what would happen to my leg and glute size in addition to my squat and deadlift strength if I just performed hip thrusts, leg extensions, and Nordic ham curls (or leg curls) twice per week (zero squats and deadlifts – not even single-leg patterns).

What’s awesome about the smith machine and Glute Drive is that they allow me to go very deep. I get more hip flexion compared to when I use the Hip Thruster. In fact, when I perform smith machine hip thrusts, I use a taller bench than normal. I felt that going deeper would help me retain more squat and deadlift strength due to hip range of motion specificity.

During the last 8 weeks, my training has been amazing. Any low back and knee pain has vanished, and my workouts have been highly productive. Twice per week, I would perform 4 sets of either smith machine or Glute Drive hip thrusts, 4 sets of leg extensions, and 4 sets of either lying or seated leg curls or Nordic ham curls. I was performing 12 sets of lower body twice per week for a total of 24 weekly sets.

My sets were in the 6-30 rep range, with the average reps per set being 10. This is a lot more repetitions than I’m used to, but my body responded well.

RESULTS 

Today, I tested my 1RM squat and deadlift strength. I hit a 405lb full squat and a 565lb sumo deadlift. This was surprising as I hadn’t performed a single rep of squats or deadlifts in 8 weeks, nor had I performed anything with a wide stance in that same amount of time. I believe I likely could have hit a 425lb squat if I wanted, and I probably could have a hit 585lb deadlift if I allowed for more slop. This is right around what I was lifting 8 weeks ago. Interestingly, the squat and deadlift movement patterns did feel unnatural. In fact, I felt very uncoordinated and awkward – similar to how I used to feel decades ago when I was first learning them, but my strength was still there.

I also reached all-time highs in leg extension strength, Nordic ham curl strength, and smith machine and Glute Drive hip thrust strength. I believe my glutes have grown slightly during this time, and my legs don’t seem to have lost any size.

PRACTICAL APPLICATION

If you are finding yourself in a lot of pain from squats and deadlifts, you can try this experiment too. Avoid them for 8 weeks, let your body heal up, and then go back to the lifts – this time without the pain. Pain inhibits muscle activation, so you’ll never experience maximum muscular gains if your body isn’t feeling good.

This experiment has taught me that hip thrusts are more effective than I ever could have imagined. There are a couple of papers showing incredible transfer from hip thrusts to squats, and one that will eventually be published showing great transfer from hip thrusts to deadlifts. These studies used beginner trainees as their subjects, however, not advanced lifters.

I don’t think leg extensions are tremendously helpful at retaining squat strength, but I do feel that Nordic ham curls are effective in helping retain deadlift strength.

Sometimes in training, we must take one step backwards in order to take two steps forwards. This 8-week program can allow you to unload your body and heal up while retaining most of your strength and muscle mass (possibly even gaining muscle).

Bear in mind this is an n=1 experiment. I look forward to hearing back from some of my followers to see if they experience similar results from this routine.

The Program Monday and Thursday: 
  • 4 sets of hip thrust for 6-30 reps (I did them on the smith machine or Nautilus Glute Drive)
  • 4 sets of leg extensions for 10-20 reps
  • 4 sets of either Nordic ham curls (3-5 reps) or lying or seated leg curls (10-20 reps)

The post The 8-Week Hip Thrust / Leg Extension / Nordic Ham Curl Experiment appeared first on Bret Contreras.

Categories: Feeds

Daniel Hayes: Making peace with the long game.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

As a devoted runner, fitness was just a way of life for Daniel Hayes. So when his health threw him a curveball and he wound up on meds that slowed his metabolism, none of his usual approaches to weight maintenance worked. Now, 35 pounds later, he’s fit again, and an inspiration to his young son.

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When you’re an avid marathoner, you expect your body to obey.

You run more miles each week; your body readily responds with improved conditioning and endurance.

You dial up protein and vegetables, your body snaps to attention with more muscle and less fat.

But in 2008, at the age of 38, the easy cause-and-effect, master-and-servant relationship that Daniel Hayes had with his body suddenly reversed.

While training for his fifth marathon, Daniel, of Chicago, Illinois, began experiencing a heartburn-like sensation every time his heart rate went above a certain point.

Knowing his body well enough to be concerned, he made an appointment with a cardiologist. The exam revealed a problem that would change the course of his life: One of his arteries was 90 percent blocked.

If he hadn’t caught it, Daniel’s doctors said his condition would have culminated in a fatal heart attack.

Now with stents in two coronary arteries and working his way through cardiac rehabilitation, Daniel was recovering well and started running again. But his body wasn’t the same.

“One of the unfortunate things is that I was put on a heavy dose of statins and a beta-blocker, which really slowed down my metabolism,” Daniel says.

“I gained about 30 pounds over the next 5 or 6 years just from the meds alone.”

Although he had years of experience maintaining a fit body, Daniel discovered his tried-and-true strategies no longer worked. They were simply no match for his new health realities.

What’s more, the time he could devote to figuring out a nutrition and fitness approach that would work was more limited than ever.

For one thing, Daniel was spending lots of time caring for his mother, who was struggling with dementia and, sadly, eventually passed away in 2013.

Meanwhile, the company he worked for was bought out, and Daniel found himself dealing with the pressures and commitments that come when you know your job is on the rocks.

Thankfully, there was a bright spot too: The birth of his first son. But as any new parent soon finds out, caring for a small child doesn’t usually increase the amount of time you’re able to dedicate to nutrition and fitness.

Daniel at his heaviest, the result of a slowed metabolism plus lots of competing priorities. Though he continued to exercise, Daniel no longer felt like the fit, healthy guy he once was.

By 2015, with his weight not budging from his new high of 238, it was clear to Daniel that he needed to try something different. He couldn’t expect a quick fix; that ship had sailed.

“I just looked myself in the eye and said, ‘I’ve got do something about this. I need to be healthy. Especially for my wife and son.’”

Enter Precision Nutrition Coaching.

Daniel realized that in order to lose weight in a way that worked with his medications, health history, and demanding life, he would need some help.

So he researched nutrition coaching options online, and liked what he read about PN’s habits-based approach.

He would need to “meet himself where he was” and focus on sustainable practices rather than short-term hacks.

So he dug into the PN program’s habits and gradually changed his approach to food.

One of the biggest changes? Eating slowly to 80 percent full — a lifelong “anchor” practice that helps you reconnect with your metabolism and hunger cues.

Daniel realized he had gotten used to feeling completely stuffed after meals.

“My parents grew up during the depression and I think that’s where my habits came from,” explains Daniel. “You had to finish everything on your plate. Nothing could be wasted. I grew up with that mindset, so it was a hard one to break through.”

After a year in the program, Daniel had added muscle mass (and lots of strength), and lost about 12 pounds of body fat. Plus, by trying out activities he hadn’t done before, he learned to think of movement and exercise as enjoyable rather than an obligation.

But the biggest transformation after that first year? The depth of his self-knowledge.

A slowed metabolism paired with deep-seated clean-your-plate habits don’t resolve overnight. So six months after finishing the program, Daniel realized that he missed the support and accountability of having a nutrition coach.

Daniel knew he had more healthy-habit practicing to do, and more weight he wanted to lose. He was on a longer journey than he’d realized — and that was ok.

Daniel finished that second year feeling more grounded than ever, and couldn’t resist the urge to sign up for a third round. To date, he has lost almost 35 pounds.

Daniel preps for a workout several months into his PN journey. The strategy that Daniel has embraced, with much success: playing the long game.

Just like marathon training, sustainable eating and fitness habits that make sense for complicated health and life circumstances often require time and repetition to take hold.

“It takes a while for someone to get into the state they’re in, so it’s going to take them a while to get out of it,” Daniel says.  “It’s not going to happen overnight.”

Now, even when life throws its characteristic challenges at Daniel — these days, it’s usually in the form of a busy schedule or having to travel for work — he knows he can rely on his newly ingrained healthy habits.

“At the very least, I know I can always practice eating slowly and eating to 80 percent full. And I can usually fit in some quick body weight exercises. Those familiar practices keeps me on track even when life gets crazy.”

Another advantage of the long game: You have the resilience to understand that your health and weight can absorb life’s inevitable nutrition and fitness “missteps.”

“Be patient,” Daniel urges. “Be patient with the process and be patient with yourself. You take it day by day. It’s these small, incremental changes that get you to your goal.”

“Sometimes you’ll eat or drink too much. Instead of being really hard on yourself, you can just say, ‘You know what? Life happens. Tomorrow is a new day.'” More importantly, Daniel knows that his new long-term habits make him a better role model for his son.

At the outset of that first year of PN Coaching, as he dreamed of somehow getting back to being the healthy guy he’d once been, Daniel envisioned taking up martial arts… to keep up with his young son, who’s been a karate enthusiast since he was 4 years old.

The moment Daniel realized he finally had enough confidence to start taking Brazilian jiu-jitsu, he know he’d “made it.”

Daniel after a jiu jitsu spar with his young son.

 

“Now when my son sees me doing martial arts, he wants to do it more too. I’m proud of that.”

Daniel’s son is most excited about finding a worthy sparring opponent.

Daniel laughs, “He’s small, but I’m his kicking bag. He thinks I’m indestructible.”

Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Daniel Hayes: Making peace with the long game. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

Dan Hibbert: Getting through grief.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

Early in their marriage, Dan Hibbert’s wife, Susan, inspired him to take better care of himself and prioritize health and fitness. Later, after tragedy struck, Dan had to get through his grief and find the strength to stay the course for the most important reason of all: his kids.

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One day, in the late 1990s, Dan Hibbert’s wife, Susan, took him aside.

Dan had been overeating, turning to food for comfort during times of stress, and he was negIecting his health. Worried for his well-being, Susan encouraged him to make some changes.

“I was probably 40 or 50 pounds overweight at that point,” Dan, of Calgary, Canada, remembers.

“My wife, bless her heart, sat me down and said, ‘I’m concerned about you and I want you to be healthy.’ And that was great. It gave me a great kick in the backside, and I did get rid of all that weight, and maintained the weight loss for quite some time.”

Dan and his family before his wife, Susan, got sick. Then, in 2011, something terrible happened.

Susan was diagnosed with colorectal cancer. After multiple surgeries and extensive chemotherapy, she entered a major depression due to sleep problems and anxiety.

Despite everyone’s best efforts, in August of 2012 Susan took her own life. It was unexpected and traumatic for Dan and their five children.

After losing Susan, 40-year-old Dan knew it was going to be challenging not only to work through his own grief, but also to take care of their five kids, dog, and the family business. But he made a decision.

“The minute I knew that the suicide had happened in our family, I felt it was my mission in life to take care of our kids.”

“I didn’t want this to define them in a negative way. I had to be there for them,” Dan says.

Dan did what he needed to do to help himself and the family cope. One of his best outlets was exercise, particularly CrossFit.

But after a couple years, Dan’s old patterns of emotional eating returned.

Once again, Dan turned to food for comfort.

He found himself reaching for a beer or glass of wine each night. And social situations became excuses to overeat. After a while, he could feel his weight creeping up.

“When you have to track off to buy new jeans, it’s like, ‘Okay. Problem,’” he laughs.

Joking aside, Dan took his weight gain seriously. He knew the importance of taking care of his own mental and physical health.

When Dan saw the scale moving into the 220s, he had a “moment of truth.”

Dan thought about his kids and his personal mission to support them. “I thought, ‘If I keep going down this road, I’m not going to be a good dad.’”

And he thought about Susan. “If she would have been here, she would have intervened,” says Dan.

“But, she wasn’t. So it was one of these moments where it’s like, ‘Well, I gotta step up and do this on my own, I guess. For my kids. And for myself, too.’”

Dan’s late wife, Susan, continues to inspire his efforts to stay healthy and fit, for himself and especially for their five kids.

Dan considered his options. He could do a six-week transformation challenge of some kind, but then the results wouldn’t last. Besides, he knew he needed some support and accountability.

He’d been following Dr. John Berardi and Precision Nutrition for some time, so he took the plunge and signed up for Precision Nutrition Coaching.

With PN, Dan was able to reset his old patterns of comfort eating, and practice new, healthier strategies.

“The program vastly expanded my toolkit of knowing what to do, and the practical ability to do it,” he explains.

Dan was committed and consistent with the program from the get-go. He found the daily check-ins and the ability to track his progress immensely helpful.

“If there’s numbers, I do well,” Dan says. “Give me a set of numbers and tell me to get from A to B, and I’m going to work hard to do it.”

And that’s exactly what he did.

Of course, we all need a little extra support sometimes, and Dan was no exception.

After a few months of steady weight loss, he found himself at a plateau, and reached out to his PN coach, Calvin, who provided some simple “suggestions and tweaks” to help Dan keep moving forward.

Then, toward the end of the PN Coaching program, Dan broke his wrist during a CrossFit class. Despite this extra challenge, Dan managed to stay consistent with his habits.

Once again, the combination of daily accountability, support from Coach Calvin, and the ability to track his progress helped Dan stay the course.

The results of that commitment? Dan lost 30 pounds, and gained lifestyle strategies to keep himself healthy and fit — inside and out.

“I appreciate the change the program made for me in appearance, and more importantly, my overall mindset.”

When Dan looks back, he’s glad he course-corrected in order to stay true to his mission of taking care of his kids.

“You do need to stop and take inventory once in a while,” he reflects. “Have those conversations with yourself about the general trends of things in your life.

“Whether it be weight, or mental health, or your habits… take some time to confront those things, and search for help with them.”

He adds, “and if there is coaching help available, make use of it. Coaching is such an asset.”

Today, Dan’s kids are all thriving, and he even has a new member of the family: his first grandchild.

All thriving, Dan and his kids goofed off during a family photo shoot recently.

Of course, coaching can’t magically eradicate grief. Change takes time, and so does healing.

“I’ve learned there are certain things that you have to allow time to get through, and you can’t exactly hurry them up,” Dan acknowledges. “But, with that said, there are things that you can do that will help.”

“The main thing to remember,” says Dan, “it’s that it’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Dan Hibbert: Getting through grief. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

Nivi Jaswal: Trading perfectionism for purpose.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

Nivi Jaswal was a high-performing senior executive with relentless drive to succeed — until one day she woke up on the floor of her hotel room after having passed out from exhaustion, hunger, or both. Now, she has traded perfectionism for a life of health, purpose, and contribution — and lost 30 pounds in the process.

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When Nivi Jaswal woke up on the floor of her Hong Kong hotel room on March 9, 2015, she was terrified.

With no memory of how she got there and 10 missed calls on her phone from concerned family members and colleagues, Nivi felt lost and confused… but she was certain about one thing: Something had to change.

She’d been traveling for a work conference, and was extremely busy. “It turned out, I hadn’t had food that day. I was running on nine espressos and some candy just to keep myself going,” recalls Nivi, who is now 37 and lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

Nivi describes herself pre-transformation as torn between perfectionism and purpose in her demanding career. That kind of career intensity was by no means atypical for Nivi.

Several demanding international assignments as a senior marketing executive with regional and global responsibility, plus a relentless inner drive to succeed, meant Nivi was living her life at breakneck speed—and putting her own needs aside.

“For almost 15 years, I didn’t get much sleep. There were days when I was up at 3am responding to emails being generated from the other side of the planet. I had supervisors tell me not to do this, but I just didn’t want any unread messages in my inbox. I wanted to clean it all up.”

Nivi believed that if she could keep her inbox clean, she stood a chance of keeping everything else completely under control. But the truth was, she was burned out, and her episode of passing out was a wake-up call.

Nivi’s life was full of travel and excitement, but health-wise she was burned out. A high-achiever to her core, Nivi took action. She saw a nutritionist, started therapy, and worked on her stress levels.

At first, it felt like things were getting better.

But later that year, she was diagnosed with hypothyroidism, or low thyroid levels.

She was also increasingly afraid of becoming diabetic. Diabetes runs in her family and her dad had been diabetic for over 20 years.

After closely following a ketogenic diet and getting a personal trainer, Nivi successfully lost some weight and was able to reverse her hypothyroidism.

But then perfectionism kicked in. Nivi ended up treating her health habits just like her work.

“I was desperately trying to keep everything on track, in the hope that if I was perfect with my workouts and my diet, then somehow this perfection would prevent me from ruining my health. Despite everything I was doing, it was like I was on an express train hurtling down that exact path.”

Meanwhile, Nivi was starting to show signs of insulin resistance, an indicator she too was on the path toward diabetes.

Fearing for her health and wellbeing, she knew she needed help — but this time, it had to be something sustainable.

Her personal trainer suggested Precision Nutrition Coaching, so Nivi decided to give it a try.

Unlike other diets and lifestyle changes she’d tried, with Precision Nutrition Nivi felt like it was okay to be less than perfect.

“One of the great things about PN is that it gives people the liberty to fail, and then to pick themselves up and try again,” says Nivi. “That is the spirit of it, and I felt that was very liberating, because then you can open up and do new things.”

The PN program encourages “experimentation” rather than perfectionism — a mindset Nivi embraced.

For one thing, she allowed herself to eat foods that had previously been strictly off-limits.

“I had a slice of bread for the first time in I don’t know how many years, and I laughed and I cried.”

PN re-introduced Nivi to the notion of eating a wider variety of whole foods, and of course, fewer processed ones.

After years of treating casein shakes and protein bars as major food groups, she started focusing on fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and plant-based proteins.

Eating whole foods wasn’t only a wake-up call for her body, it also inspired her to make a complete career evolution.

Deciding that being part of the “big food and big health” supply chain no longer lined up with her belief system, Nivi decided to start not one, but two new companies: a digital marketplace for rural women artisans from Northwestern India (where Nivi is originally from), and a non-profit that runs healthcare-related camps for the same artisan community.

Finally released of her perfectionism, Nivi channeled her drive toward purpose.

From the time she woke up on that hotel room floor to the end of the PN program, Nivi had lost nearly 30 pounds… and she wasn’t the only one. Nivi wound up inspiring everyone around her.

Nivi’s 68-year old father was inspired to join a diabetes coaching program. In doing so, he got off most of his meds, and greatly reduced his insulin dosage.

Nivi’s mom, also 68, reversed her hypothyroidism, and returned her once-high blood pressure to normal. Her early-stage arthritis also disappeared when she lost weight.

Nivi’s father-in-law committed to an exercise routine. At 76, he was featured as “fit senior of the month” at his local fitness center.

And after following Nivi’s lead on portion control and incorporating more fresh, plant-based foods, her husband, Sean, lost close to 40 pounds.

The experience also deepened their close bond.

“Without my husband’s support, teamwork, constant encouragement, and readily adopting our new approach to nutrition, my PN journey would not have been as happy, fulfilling, or exciting.

“In being able to discover our life’s true purpose, our partners play a very significant role. I feel truly grateful and blessed.”

Instead of being caught up in her own perfectionism, Nivi is now leading by example.

Now, Nivi aims to lead by example. “The teacher only appears when the student is truly ready for the lesson,” she reflects. “I’ve altered the pace and purpose of my life and, in doing so, dialed up my efficiency and effectiveness.”

“Now, I’m actually getting more done,” Nivi says.

I’ve learned that self-pacing and practicing self-compassion doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re either slow or not competitive. You’re more competitive, because you’re happy while you’re at it.”

Currently in training at The Mayo Clinic’s wellness coaching program, Nivi’s purpose is to help prevent burnout and stress (and associated health issues) in other executives like her.

“A healthy workplace is a happy workplace. While several corporate executives feel forced to be strong at all times, my purpose to help them recognize that indeed, ‘Happy is the New Strong’ — a mantra borne out of my own experience.”

“We are our own biggest projects, and the sooner we realize it the better.”

Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Nivi Jaswal: Trading perfectionism for purpose. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

True stories: How these 6 people overcame huge health and fitness barriers (and you can too).

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

Wouldn’t it be nice if embarking on a health and fitness journey meant a straight line to success? For better or worse, that’s not real life — but there is hope. Here are six true stories from Precision Nutrition Coaching clients who faced major obstacles on the road to weight loss, overcame them, and used what they learned to become better and stronger people than ever before.

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It’s become a quintessential question of the modern age: Why is it so hard for people to lose weight and get fit?

The answer is, well, life.

Demanding jobs. Fear of change. Plummeting self-confidence. Social lives that revolve around beer and bar food. Starting a family. Caring for a sick loved one, or maybe even grieving a loss.

These health and fitness barriers can feel insurmountable to those facing them.

Sometimes, for a period, hopelessness will have its way. You might feel like no one understands and no one can help you. You might feel like there’s nothing beyond the bottom.

In the course of coaching over 100,000 clients, Precision Nutrition coaches have heard ALL the stories of struggle — nail-biters and gut-punchers and heartbreakers. And if we’ve learned anything from these stories, it’s that people are strong.

It seems somewhere inside us all there’s a little voice that says: Keep going.

The following six stories are from people who kept going.

Despite the major obstacles they faced, these Precision Nutrition Coaching clients managed to keep moving forward and crest the top of their personal mountain.

These stories are from real people just like you.

Which means, if you’ve hit a seemingly immovable rock, whatever that looks like for you, the story isn’t over.

You just have to keep going.

Meet Bob.

At just 59, Bob Miller had experienced several brushes with death due to serious heart and kidney problems. But a desire to meet his someday grandkids pushed him to enroll in coaching, and he achieved what once seemed impossible. Now, with a healthier body and significant weight loss, Bob is embracing a future full of possibilities.

Read Bob's story

Meet Nivi.

Nivi Jaswal was a high-performing senior executive with a relentless drive to succeed — until one day she woke up on a hotel room floor having passed out from exhaustion. At 37 years old, she learned that self-compassion, not perfectionism, was the way to achieve her full potential.

Read Nivi's story

Meet Daniel.

Daniel Hayes, a dedicated marathon runner, came close to suffering a fatal heart attack at age 38. After surgery and metabolism-slowing meds, Daniel just couldn’t seem to find a way back to his fit, healthy self. Precision Nutrition Coaching helped him find the path to sustainable habits that will keep him healthy for the long term.

Read Daniel's story

Meet Sheila.

Before Precision Nutrition Coaching, going to the gym was terrifying for 49-year-old Sheila Brooks. After years of believing she wasn’t cut out for exercise due to a disability, she got comfortable picking up heavy barbells — and redefined herself as capable and strong in the process.

Read Sheila's story

Meet Dan.

After the unexpected loss of his wife, Dan Hibbert was left with a tremendous amount of grief and five kids to care for. He made the powerful choice to step up for his family, and through Precision Nutrition Coaching, the 45-year-old has discovered that fitness could be one of his greatest allies in coping with loss.

Read Dan's story

Meet Alana.

When Alana Wylie-Reeves, 54, started Precision Nutrition Coaching, she could barely bend over to pick something up off the floor. After a year with the program, she shed the extra weight that was slowing her down, and gained the knowledge that she’s more resilient than she ever imagined.

Read Alana's story Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post True stories: How these 6 people overcame huge health and fitness barriers (and you can too). appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

Sheila Brooks: Freeing herself from her disability story.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

Growing up with a bone disease, Sheila Brooks came to define herself by her disability. Exercise? She couldn’t. Become an athlete? No way. By the time she was an adult, that self-story had solidified; she was downright petrified of the gym. But now she’s finally busted that mental wall — and lost 52 pounds (and counting).

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“In the beginning, I was terrified.”

Only a few months ago, the very notion of walking into a gym was enough to make Sheila Brooks want to turn and run.

For Sheila, 49, of Edmonds, Washington, the gym was more than intimidating; it felt flat-out impenetrable. She never thought she’d be comfortable enough to walk through the door, let alone exercise there daily.

“I have a free membership through my work at a gym that’s two miles away, so I really didn’t have any excuse not to go, other than fear,” Sheila says.

“I was really uncomfortable with the idea of working out in front of other people. I thought, ‘I’m awkward’ and ‘I’m weird looking.’ These were the kinds of things that went through my head, and it was enough to keep me out of the gym.”

Sheila’s fear stemmed from a deeply rooted belief that she was not an athletic or physically capable person — and never would be. That’s because Sheila was born with a bone disease. Her disability, and her beliefs about it, held her back from participating in physical activity.

“It keeps me from doing any sort of high-impact stuff. Growing up, I wasn’t athletic at all,” she reflects. “I couldn’t participate in any sort of sports, and exercise itself wasn’t a part of my life.”

As a result, Sheila believed she was not strong, and her body simply wasn’t cut out for exercise. So she avoided it.

Sheila was overweight, unhappy, unhealthy, and generally feeling stuck. A rare photo of Sheila, pre-transformation. “I have done a thorough job of hiding from the camera all these years,” she says.

Over the years, Sheila’s inner story about what she couldn’t do became more than a story about athleticism. It became an identity that held her back from experiencing everything that life has to offer.

“I was so miserable. I was very overweight and very depressed and sad about life in general. I’d shut myself away. I thought I couldn’t do anything and I hated the way I looked, so I just said no to everything. Finally, I knew something had to change.”

So Sheila took a leap of faith and signed up for Precision Nutrition Coaching, making a conscious effort to trust the program.

“I put my faith in the PN program. I didn’t have any faith in myself. So I figured, why not put my faith in something else?”

In just a few months with Precision Nutrition, Sheila learned a lot, including her “why” behind her goals, and practical nutrition basics like meal prep and portion control. Plus, she was doing her workouts regularly… from the safety and comfort of her own home.

But the gym still felt like a “big monster” that she was tired of hiding from.

Sheila decided it was time to face her fear.

She reached out to her coach for support. Coach Lisanne’s suggestion: Rather than jumping in with both feet, why not start small?

“My coach suggested I pick one exercise in my workout plan that I felt comfortable doing. For me, that was the sumo deadlift. She said, ‘Okay, go in and just do that one exercise and then leave. Don’t do the whole workout, just do one exercise and leave’.”

Sheila gathered her nerve, walked into the gym, and did 10 reps of a sumo deadlift.

“I was terrified and felt weird,” she acknowledges, “but I went in and did 10 deadlifts and that was it and then I left. It all started from there.”

Sheila looking more and more confident during workouts.

That simple act turned out to be the catalyst for massive change.

After that, Sheila had a bit more confidence, so she scheduled a session with a trainer at the gym to show her around. Next time she came in, she was able to do her full PN workout.

Was she still nervous and uncomfortable? Yep. But she did it anyway.

And she knew that Coach Lisanne was cheering her on.

After facing her fears of the gym, Sheila not only shed pounds, she started shedding that old story about herself.

Sheila made a commitment to herself to show up in the gym every single day, and she kept it. At the same time, she maintained her daily PN lessons and habits, and reached out to Coach Lisanne whenever she needed a little extra support.

Sheila’s consistency paid off, and she saw results in her body: Only six months into the program, she’d already lost 55 pounds, and was looking better in her clothes.

Meanwhile, Sheila began to realize that something subtle but significant was happening.

Her old beliefs about herself — about being incapable, unathletic, or weak — were being replaced with something much more powerful.

“I began to realize that a lot of those mental scripts that I’d told myself in the past are not true.”

“For example, I’ve discovered that I’m really strong. Because of my disability, I can’t jump and I can’t run — but I’m strong. I’m sort of amazed at the weights that I can lift. Now, I’m looking into competitive powerlifting and I would have never, ever thought that that would be possible.”

She adds, “It’s like I’ve discovered that my body’s made for something, and I’m good at it.”

Discovering her strength has opened up a whole new world of possibility for Sheila, whether it’s daily life, or big adventures.

“There are little things I can do, like carrying grocery bags, that are much easier nowadays. This summer I got into hiking. I live in the Northwest and hiking is a huge thing around here. It’s actually a fun thing to do now.”

In a bold move, Sheila even took a Brazilian jiu jitsu class. “I went because I wanted to see what it was like. I’m not as scared to try new things anymore.”

She’s even planning a countryside hike through France — an incredible vacation for someone who used to struggle to walk more than a mile.

To date, Sheila is down 52 pounds from her highest weight. (In the past few months, she has gained three more pound of muscle, and she continues to lose inches.)

Post-transformation, Sheila no longer defines herself my what she can’t do.

“My time with PN has been about redefining myself,” says Sheila. “I have a physical disability, yes, but I now realize that, for years, I’d been limiting myself.

“Nowadays, I realize that I’m capable of lifting heavy weights and stuff, but it’s more than that… I’m not going to define myself by what I can’t do. I don’t have to limit myself anymore.”

At last, for Sheila, the possibilities really are endless.

Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Sheila Brooks: Freeing herself from her disability story. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

Alana Wylie-Reeves: Getting comfortable with change.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

At more than 250 pounds, Alana Wylie-Reeves found herself uncomfortable, frustrated, and immobile. The biggest obstacle she faced in her efforts toward better movement and health? A deep-seated aversion to change. Here’s how she found the resilience to embrace discomfort — and lose more than 60 pounds in the process.

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Two years ago, Alana Wylie-Reeves couldn’t bend over to pick something up from the ground.

“If I dropped something on the floor, it had to stay there. I had zero mobility,” says Alana, 54. “If I forgot something in the laundry room in the basement, I’d have to think about how I was going to get back down the two flights of stairs to get it.”

Alana’s weight had yo-yoed for years. At her heaviest, Alana weighed 257 pounds.

“I remember once I went to stand on a step ladder, but the maximum weight was 225. I couldn’t even stand on a ladder to change a light bulb,” she recalls.

At the same time, she was having more and more trouble getting through her shifts working in the paint department at Home Depot in Edmonton, Alberta.

“There is a lot of bending, moving, and lifting at my work. It’s pretty physically demanding and I was having a really hard time with it.”

Alana poses for one of her first progress photos of Precision Nutrition Coaching. Alana had tried diets and the occasional workout video, but they didn’t become habits that stuck.

“The weight would come tumbling back because nothing in my life would change. I just couldn’t find a way of eating that I could live with.”

But as challenging and at times painful as Alana’s life had become, in some ways it seemed more comfortable to her than the alternative: changing.

“As an only child of a single parent, we moved a lot, always trying to keep the paycheck ahead of the rent,” Alana explains. “I experienced a lot of change. Unwanted change, at that. Change I had no control over whatsoever.”

As a result, throughout adulthood Alana’s aversion to change deepened. She consciously avoided disruption at all costs — including her health.

“I used to walk around saying, ‘I hate change’. I was living my life to avoid being uncomfortable. I was scared to make changes because it was uncomfortable and scary.”

On top of it all, like many moms Alana found herself prioritizing her family over her own needs and wellbeing.

“My sacrifices, it seemed, were always for the greater good of the family,” she reflects. “But do that long enough and you begin to give up the effort to discern what really matters to you.”

Considering the barriers she was facing, Alana recognized that she’d need help if she wanted to clear them and find a path to health and fitness.

At the thought of having some support, Alana decided that, uncomfortable or not, it was time to make a change.

She was determined to figure out a way of eating that would help her lose weight and stay healthy for the long term.

Enter the Precision Nutrition Coaching program.

Alana started PN Coaching and very quickly realized that the road to change would require getting a little more comfortable with discomfort.

Take, for example, one of the first habits in PN Coaching: eating to 80 percent full.

“If you’re practicing the habit, you’re likely experiencing a little discomfort and resistance,” says Alana. “We’re also asked to reflect on how we have dealt with uncomfortable things in the past.”

Persisting with the habit, and reflecting on how it made her feel, helped Alana realize that she could, in fact, tolerate change.

PN lessons often encourage clients to practice getting out of their comfort zone, a little bit at a time. As time went on, rather than resisting the discomfort, Alana gradually found herself choosing to embrace it.

“In the beginning my workouts were just five minutes of walking. That was it,” she recalls. “But as I progressed, I began to apply the idea [of embracing discomfort] in a physical way. For example, taking that difficult lunge just a titch past comfortable, running a bit when I was on my walks just to try it out, that sort of thing.”

Alana practices getting outside of her comfort zone during a workout. Alana was discovering that she did, in fact, possess the skill needed for leaning in to change: resilience.

But would her resilience, her acceptance of change, stick?

Throughout Alana’s time at PN, she faced many challenges in her personal life — the kinds of challenges that had kept her from her goals in the past.

Her mother needed help with one of her rental properties, and Alana threw herself into the six-week project, finding herself 10 pounds heavier than before.

“I stopped exercising and went into junk food free-fall. I think of it now with horror — but that was my ‘normal’ back then: Work hard, don’t exercise and eat junk!”

Her second born child came out as transgender. “It rocked the immediate family,” Alana explains.

Her mother was in and out of the hospital due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. “Learning to meet her needs, while continuing to meet my own, is new to me,” Alana says.

She injured her back in a Spartan Race.

Alana went from too immobile to pick something up off the floor to competing in Spartan Races — willingly — in the course of 18 months.

But through these rough waters, Alana stayed the course.

“I remember being really discouraged, but I stayed in touch with Coach Lisanne. We had frequent coaching calls, and she reminded me that I was resilient — just for showing back up!”

Getting out of her comfort zone paid off.

Alana dropped pounds, gained mobility, and went from not being able to bend over to doing squats, deadlifts, and modified push-ups.

Today, at 196 pounds— 61 pounds lighter than when she started — everyday movement is no longer a hindrance.

“The other night, I forgot something in the laundry room and didn’t even think twice about it. I ran down two stories and didn’t even hesitate,” she says. “And I can do things like squat down and rearrange leftovers in the fridge. I couldn’t do that before.”

Alana now sees herself as someone who lives life at the edge of her comfort zone.

“Gradually, my story around change, well, changed,” she reflects. “Change wasn’t something I needed be wary of. It became something I could embrace, a little bit at a time. With help from my coach, I integrated the idea that I am someone who can allow change—and a lot of it—into my identity.”

With her newfound zest for life, she’s even pursuing a life-long dream to be an interior designer/decorator, and re-started a certificate program she began about 15 years ago.

Turns out, embracing discomfort has a surprisingly pleasant side-effect: happiness. Post-transformation, Alana’s family has never seen her happier.

“One of my sons was saying yesterday he has never seen me happier in my life,” says Alana.

And she’s just getting started.

“I have more energy for life. Most people my age are slowing down and looking at retirement and relaxing. I feel like I’m 25 years old. The last 20 years were awful, so I’m going to make the next 25 great.”

Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Alana Wylie-Reeves: Getting comfortable with change. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

Bob Miller: Persisting despite serious health problems.

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 22:01

By his early 50s, Bob Miller was facing metabolic and cardiovascular health issues so serious that he’d already had a very close brush with death. With his weight at an all-time high and his mobility severely compromised, Bob found a way to lose nearly 100 pounds, one small step at a time.

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“I have vascular disease, heart disease and Stage 4 kidney disease… ”

“… I have already had an AAA repair, quadruple bypass, 8 stents in my heart, and we are beginning discussions about the inevitability of kidney dialysis and a kidney transplant.”

Those are the intake notes for Bob Miller from two years ago, when he started his Precision Nutrition Coaching journey.

Though Bob had been facing these very serious and mobility-compromising health conditions, Bob had an ambitious goal: to lose a lot of weight.

And, in fact, he already had.

“Almost seven years ago, I weighed 260 pounds,” reflects Bob, 60, of Edmonds, Washington.

Bob at his heaviest, before making a pact with himself to get healthy for his family.

“At that point, I hadn’t realized how much weight I’d gained. My grandmother had died and I needed to buy some clothes to go to the funeral. So I bought a jacket and slacks and I was just shocked at my 46-inch waist and my 48-inch coat.

“That just stunned me. So I had these brand-new clothes and I thought, ‘Something’s got to change here, this is just not going to work’.”

So, Bob made a plan.

“I immediately said, ‘Okay, I’ve got to control how much I’m eating, and low-carb diets have always worked for me to get the weight off, I’m going to do that.’ So that’s what I started to do. Over the next couple of years, I went from 260 down to somewhere in the 210 range.”

Yet after a while, Bob’s weight loss stalled. And stalled. And stalled.

At 5’7”, Bob knew he had more weight to lose. But after 18 months without any further progress, he had to concede that doing things on his own was no longer working.

And Bob wasn’t ready to give up on his own health.

“I wanted to see my grandkids, they haven’t even been born yet. And I didn’t want my wife to be a widow.”

“There are people in my life that depend on me and count on me… and I’ve already had a couple of pretty significant brushes with death.”

“When I had my heart attack, I really thought I was going to die. As my wife was driving me to the hospital, I realized I couldn’t feel my face, my arms, my legs,” Bob recalls.

“So I’ve known that we can all die at any time, but I certainly didn’t want it to be because I had not done everything I could to take care of myself. I didn’t want my legacy to be, ‘That son of a gun, if he had just taken care of himself, he would still be here.’”

Those very powerful reasons drew Bob to Precision Nutrition Coaching.

Once Bob signed up, he was determined to stay committed.

“I was going to see this program out to the end, no matter what, and just see what the results were,” Bob says.

“Even if I wasn’t seeing results on day 364, I was not going to quit before day 365.”

Of course, Bob did see results long before day 364, but admittedly, the pounds didn’t drop as quickly as he’d hoped. At first, Bob thought the program was going too slowly.

“For the first few weeks, they’re giving you anchor habits. If all else fails, you go back to these. At week four I was like, are you frigging kidding me,” Bob laughs.

But those anchor habits turned out to represent a fundamental shift for Bob’s approach to food, exercise, lifestyle habits, and even mindset. In particular, the very first habit — make time for your fitness and nutrition — turned out to make the biggest difference.

“Make time — you know what, that is the most important thing I do in my life,” says Bob.

“Making time for food prep, making time to think about my meal planning, or what I’m doing for the day and where the complications are. Making time for working out, making time for sleep, all those things. In my very busy life, I never realized how important the principal of making time was.”

It wasn’t all smooth sailing. Bob’s health complications brought some extra challenges when it came to his workouts.

His conditions can cause Bob to have low energy, especially by mid-afternoon. But his new habit of “making time” helped him work around that barrier.

“My workouts are a top priority for my day, so I do them first thing in the morning when my energy is the highest. That way I take the ‘I’m out of energy’ excuse out of the equation.”

His combination of conditions can also cause chest pain when his heart rate is elevated from intense activity. Once again, Bob found a way.

“I’ve worked closely with my cardiologist to manage this with a combination of medication and adjustments to my exercise… missing a workout is not an option!”

While he steadily worked through these challenges, Bob also discovered the unexpected value of having someone in his corner — his PN coach. Having Coach Jonathan check in on him, reply to his messages, and just be there helped Bob stay true to his commitment.

“I needed somebody to hold me accountable, I needed somebody to be there,” he says. “There is value in just simply knowing that my coach was there.”

By the end of the PN Coaching program, Bob had lost another 45 pounds.

Bob poses in old pants after his 100-pound weight loss. Much to his surprise — and his doctor’s — Bob’s kidneys were also functioning better.

“Before PN, my nephrologist was estimating my kidney function at about 26-28 percent, and I was losing about a percentage point every two to three months at one point,” Bob says.

“I went from being on the fast track to dialysis and transplant to stable kidney function for six or eight months now. My nephrologist is encouraged. I can’t believe it. It’s amazing.”

But perhaps Bob’s biggest transformation is internal. He’s shifted from fearing the future, to chasing new possibilities.

Bob is currently enrolled in his second round of PN Coaching — this time, to see what is possible.

“Can I get to single digit body fat? What do I look like then, what do I feel like then? What else can I do with my fitter body and better health that I’ve never been able to do? I’ve got no idea. But I’m willing to do a science experiment and see what is possible for myself.”

The very notion of exploring new possibilities marks a sea change for Bob.

“What is possible…” he reflects. “It wasn’t all that long ago where that was an impossible thought.”

“There’s no, ‘Okay, I did my diet, I’m done.’ My brain and my body and my mind and my heart have been permanently changed.”

In fact, Bob’s physical transformation has been so significant and unexpected that he’s still getting used to his new, slimmer body, and what it can do.

“One of the keys to overcoming my unique challenges was walking through it with my wife. She was, and is, awesome.”

“I had an experience recently where my dog’s ball had gone behind the television console. I was like ‘Oh, I can’t back there, I’ll have to figure something out.’

“Then I thought, ‘Wait a second, you probably can.’ And I did, and I didn’t touch the wall or the back of the console.”

Bob plans to use the final half of his second year with PN exploring the emotional issues surrounding such a big transformation.

“Sometimes I don’t recognize myself. I’ll see myself in the mirror and be surprised by the person I see looking back, or look at my pants and wonder how I’m going to fit in those tiny things! My physical changes are a bit ahead of my emotional and spiritual growth.”

But one thing is certain: As Bob pursues new possibilities for himself, he knows there’s no going back.

Want help overcoming your health and fitness barriers?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Bob Miller: Persisting despite serious health problems. appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

The Greatest Gifts for Powerlifters Transitioning to a Commercial Gym

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 01:23
I literally have no other gym options in my area. Please, give a stranded powerlifter such as myself hope... and everything on this list.
Categories: Feeds

Six Weeks to Bigger Biceps

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Sun, 12/09/2018 - 01:05
In this article, I can’t promise you Lee Priest-proportioned bicep development, but I will share some ideas to unlocking new growth over a six-week period of time.
Categories: Feeds

Higher Rep Work with the Conjugate Method

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Sat, 12/08/2018 - 01:22
Higher rep work can be beneficial, but it needs to be properly managed. We are still going to use 1-rep maxes for our primary means of developing intra/intermuscular coordination, but there are a few strategies we can use to ensure we incur extra volume when needed.
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