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Bodybuilding for the Powerlifter: The Offseason (with Full Program)

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Wed, 12/19/2018 - 10:13
The bad news: You can’t go hard all the time. It’s the quickest way to burn out — to see your progress stall, to get injured, and to lose interest in your training. The good news: A bodybuilding-style approach to the offseason has a ton of benefits for the powerlifter.
Categories: Feeds

Precision Nutrition Coaching: January 2019 Men’s Finalists. Help us give away $125,000!

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Wed, 12/19/2018 - 06:00

Just one year ago, these 20 guys were stressed, out of shape, and tired of wanting the fitter body they just couldn’t seem to pull off. Now, after 12 months of Precision Nutrition Coaching, they’ve transformed their health, their bodies, and their lives.

They also have the chance to take home part of the $125,000 in prize money we’ve once again committed to this latest round of top clients. Scroll through these amazing photos and vote for the finalist whose transformation impresses you most.

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Every year in Precision Nutrition Coaching, we help men and women from around the world dramatically improve their eating habits and lifestyle.

They lose weight, gain strength, and completely transform their bodies, health, and fitness.

We also give them a big, motivating goal to shoot for: $250,000 in cash prizes.

Consider it an antidote to the “you must suffer and feel guilty to get in shape” message you typically get from the fitness industry.

See, guys come to us wanting big changes:

  • They want to lose weight, build muscle, and shed body fat.
  • They want to feel physically and mentally strong.
  • They want to make healthier food choices, consistently.
  • They want to stop worrying about their health.
  • They want to start doing all the awesome things they previously wanted to do but thought they couldn’t.

Above all, they want to become the fittest, strongest, healthiest versions of themselves.

In our experience, big, inspiring, life-changing goals like these are a whole lot easier to achieve when there’s a huge bonus at stake.

So, every six months, we divvy up a big pot of prize money for the best transformations among our male and female clients.

For the current group—which started in January 2018 and is wrapping up now—we’ve committed $125,000.

And right now, we need your help to choose our Men’s Grand Prize winner.

Help choose our Men’s Grand Prize winner (Top prize = $25,000)

The guys below started their Precision Nutrition Coaching journey in all shapes and sizes, and they hail from all parts of the globe. They’re a diverse group with one thing in common: They finally have the bodies and health they’ve wanted for a long time, and they’re confident they’ll stay this way for good.

How’d they do it?

No crash diets. No Biggest Loser-type bootcamps. And no full-time chefs.

Just research-based nutrition and lifestyle habits practiced daily with personalized help from our expert coaches.

To vote for the guy you think should win the $25,000 Grand Prize, scroll through the photos below. Make your choice by clicking the “Vote for Finalist” button under the one you think achieved the best transformation.

But please don’t stop there. Once you’ve seen all the finalists and selected your #1 choice, scroll down to the bottom of this post.

At the bottom you’ll need to verify your choice. To do this, click the “Place your vote” button. This will log your vote and help us make our decision.

Thanks for your help!

Finalist #1 Lost 43 lbs and 26 total inches! Age: 29 years
Weight Lost: 43 lbs (from 191 lbs to 148 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 26 inches (from 237 inches to 211 inches)
Vote for Finalist #1

Finalist #1 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #2 Lost 64 lbs and 37 total inches! Age: 43 years
Weight Lost: 64 lbs (from 272 lbs to 208 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 37 inches (from 276 inches to 239 inches)
Vote for Finalist #2

Finalist #2 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #3 Lost 36 lbs and 21 total inches! Age: 42 years
Weight Lost: 36 lbs (from 217 lbs to 181 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 21 inches (from 241 inches to 220 inches)
Vote for Finalist #3

Finalist #3 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #4 Lost 45 lbs and 25 total inches! Age: 48 years
Weight Lost: 45 lbs (from 259 lbs to 214 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 25 inches (from 270 inches to 245 inches)
Vote for Finalist #4

Finalist #4 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #5 Lost 54 lbs and 42 total inches! Age: 36 years
Weight Lost: 54 lbs (from 289 lbs to 235 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 42 inches (from 295 inches to 253 inches)
Vote for Finalist #5

Finalist #5 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #6 Lost 58 lbs and 45 total inches! Age: 44 years
Weight Lost: 58 lbs (from 225 lbs to 167 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 45 inches (from 261 inches to 216 inches)
Vote for Finalist #6

Finalist #6 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #7 Lost 36 lbs and 31 total inches! Age: 44 years
Weight Lost: 36 lbs (from 166 lbs to 130 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 31 inches (from 232 inches to 201 inches)
Vote for Finalist #7

Finalist #7 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #8 Lost 32 lbs and 24 total inches! Age: 54 years
Weight Lost: 32 lbs (from 186 lbs to 154 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 24 inches (from 234 inches to 210 inches)
Vote for Finalist #8

Finalist #8 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #9 Lost 14 lbs and 5 total inches! Age: 60 years
Weight Lost: 14 lbs (from 200 lbs to 186 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 5 inches (from 246 inches to 241 inches)
Vote for Finalist #9

Finalist #9 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #10 Lost 52 lbs and 35 total inches! Age: 41 years
Weight Lost: 52 lbs (from 245 lbs to 193 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 35 inches (from 260 inches to 225 inches)
Vote for Finalist #10

Finalist #10 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #11 Lost 54 lbs and 29 total inches! Age: 49 years
Weight Lost: 54 lbs (from 271 lbs to 217 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 29 inches (from 244 inches to 215 inches)
Vote for Finalist #11

Finalist #11 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #12 Lost 65 lbs and 42 total inches! Age: 26 years
Weight Lost: 65 lbs (from 264 lbs to 199 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 42 inches (from 269 inches to 227 inches)
Vote for Finalist #12

Finalist #12 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #13 Lost 52 lbs and 34 total inches! Age: 32 years
Weight Lost: 52 lbs (from 225 lbs to 173 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 34 inches (from 253 inches to 219 inches)
Vote for Finalist #13

Finalist #13 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #14 Lost 22 lbs and 13 total inches! Age: 47 years
Weight Lost: 22 lbs (from 193 lbs to 171 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 13 inches (from 235 inches to 222 inches)
Vote for Finalist #14

Finalist #14 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #15 Lost 14 lbs and 3 total inches! Age: 34 years
Weight Lost: 14 lbs (from 192 lbs to 178 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 3 inches (from 224 inches to 221 inches)
Vote for Finalist #15

Finalist #15 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #16 Lost 46 lbs and 23 total inches! Age: 47 years
Weight Lost: 46 lbs (from 229 lbs to 183 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 23 inches (from 246 inches to 223 inches)
Vote for Finalist #16

Finalist #16 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #17 Lost 28 lbs and 5 total inches! Age: 50 years
Weight Lost: 28 lbs (from 208 lbs to 180 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 5 inches (from 235 inches to 230 inches)
Vote for Finalist #17

Finalist #17 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #18 Lost 20 lbs and 18 total inches! Age: 49 years
Weight Lost: 20 lbs (from 204 lbs to 184 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 18 inches (from 261 inches to 243 inches)
Vote for Finalist #18

Finalist #18 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #19 Lost 26 lbs and 17 total inches! Age: 29 years
Weight Lost: 26 lbs (from 191 lbs to 165 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 17 inches (from 235 inches to 218 inches)
Vote for Finalist #19

Finalist #19 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #20 Lost 32 lbs and 19 total inches! Age: 41 years
Weight Lost: 32 lbs (from 202 lbs to 170 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 19 inches (from 235 inches to 216 inches)
Vote for Finalist #20

Finalist #20 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Confirm your choice for the Men’s $25,000 Grand Prize winner

When confirming your vote, it’s important to remember that we’re not rewarding the best bodies per se. We’re rewarding the most incredible transformations.

In Precision Nutrition Coaching, we certainly don’t expect folks to start off looking like fitness models. Heck, we don’t even expect folks to end up looking like fitness models.

We’re looking for winners who’ve made the most dramatic changes in their own bodies, starting from wherever they were at the beginning.

That’s because our coaching is for men and women of all shapes and sizes. And your vote should reflect who you think achieved the most dramatic changes over the last 12 months.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll. Want to transform your body just like these men did?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for looking and feeling better. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Precision Nutrition Coaching: January 2019 Men’s Finalists. Help us give away $125,000! appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

Categories: Feeds

The Ugly Rise of Poaching Athletes in Weightlifting

Let’s talk about poaching in weightlifting, shall we?  It’s a buzzing topic these days, for sure. In case you don’t know what it is, “poaching” is when weightlifting coaches try to lure athletes away from the coaches they’re currently working with. Basically, poachers build their roster by stealing lifters from other coaches. That’s probably the simplest way to describe it.   There are two things you need to know about poaching. First, it and
Categories: Feeds

2018 in Review

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 11:27
2018, you were a great new chapter. You've put me in a good place with my training, my clients’ training, and the team’s training. 2019, see you soon.
Categories: Feeds

Pushing New Limits When the Weight Isn’t Getting Heavier

http://deansomerset.com/feed/ - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 09:51

Every now and then I’ll have a coaching client (online or in-person) get flustered when they hit a plateau. They try to find out if there’s something special they should be doing, drinking, avoiding, sleeping on/in/with/near to help improve their performance to squeak out some more weight on the bar than last week.

Maybe there’s some magical combination of foam rolling and pre-workout tacos that can automatically guarantee more mass to smash that ass, but I haven’t found it just yet when someone has hit the sickly sweet sundrance of a plateau.

But if pre-workout tacos are magical, it’s likely when they give you an extra scoop of meat, maybe even 2 extra scoops.

First, a plateau isn’t necessarily a bad thing. You spent a lot of time and energy working hard to get to the point where you could now be at a new plateau, so automatically all of your workouts are a bit heavier or with more volume than they were a few months ago before your plateau, so enjoy that progress and live a little while in that new level of excellence.

Second, a plateau in the amount of weight you can put on the bar can give a lot of options for further progressive overload that don’t simply involve sliding another plate or two on the bar. Sure, it would be nice to toss around more plates than a coked out dishwasher at Denny’s working the Friday night shift, but unless your nickname is the Mountain and you live in Iceland, it’s likely not going to happen for you.

Third, a plateau in one variable of your training program does not necessitate plateaus in others.

Say I have a max squat of 200kg for 1 rep, and can do 180 kgs for 3. A realistic workout for this could look something like this:

Set 1: 170 x 3

Set 2: 170 x 3

Set 3: 175 x 3

Set 4: 180 x 3

Set 5: 180 x 1

This would give 5 sets of 13 reps total volume, working between 170-180 kg.

We could do a couple of things with this to produce a different overload. We could include more sets or reps at a heavier weight with subsequent sets. Something like this:

Set 1: 170 x 3

Set 2: 170 x 3

Set 3: 175 x 3

Set 4: 180 x 2

Set 5: 180 x 2

Set 6: 180 x 2

Set 7: 180 x 1

Here, we kept sets 1-3 the same, but expanded the number of total reps used at 180 kg, moving from 4 reps to 7.

Conversely, we could do more work at the lower weight with some back-off sets, like this:

Set 1: 170 x 3

Set 2: 170 x 3

Set 3: 175 x 3

Set 4: 180 x 3

Set 5: 180 x 1

Set 6: 165 x 3

Set 7: 165 x 3

Set 8: 165 x 3

Set 9: cry in the corner

In this example, the total volume went up by 9 reps with a significant load

Adding in some additional volume at a higher load can have a significant impact of producing progressive overload on the working tissues, which can help eventually spur some growth and strength improvements.

A further option could be to use the sub-max loading, but crank out more reps per set before pushing into the heavy sets:

Set 1: 170 x 5

Set 2: 170 x 5

Set 3: 175 x 3

Set 4: 180 x 3

Set 5: 180 x 1

Here, the sub-max build up volume went up from 6 reps to 10, while the top sets stayed the same.

Maybe we could do something where we jump up to an earlier heavy set, then back off with some soul-crushing volume:

Set 1: 170 x 3

Set 2: 180 x 2

Set 3: 190 x 1

Set 4: 175 x 3

Set 5: 175 x 3

Set 6: 170 x 3

Comparing total volume of weight lifted by reps, this scheme delivers 2620 kg over 15 reps for an average load of 174.67 kg per rep, whereas the first scheme delivers 2265 kg over 13 reps, delivering an average load of 174.23 kg per rep. The loading is fairly similar, with a higher volume in the last example.

These are some simple and effective ways to produce a degree of overload on different workout plans. The big element to consider isn’t just the total weight on the bar, but the workload being performed within the workout. Progressive overload doesn’t just have to come with the number on the bar, but by producing a higher volume of work at a given resistance, or a higher total workload at a similar average weight per rep. Play with the numbers, have some fun, and pay the extra for a second scoop on your tacos.

The post Pushing New Limits When the Weight Isn’t Getting Heavier appeared first on DeanSomerset.com.

Categories: Feeds

The JuggLife | Top Strength Stories of 2018

http://www.jtsstrength.com/feed/ - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 09:40

What did you think were the most significant moments to the strength world during 2018?

The post The JuggLife | Top Strength Stories of 2018 appeared first on Juggernaut Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

5 Items to Make This the Fattest Christm-ass Ever

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 09:16
Volunteering at the local mall as the jolly fat man in red? Want to convince your kids that you are the one in charge of the naughty and nice list? If you want to look like Santa Claus himself, stop gobbling your kids' cookies and milk on Christmas Eve and look no further than what's on this list.
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Why Kids Should Cheat the Deadlift

http://www.tonygentilcore.com/feed/ - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 08:03

Today’s guest post come courtesy of Dan Edelman of The Brand X Method, which is a wonderful institution dedicated to improving youth sport(s).

I love what they stand for and what the strive to instill in their coaches and athletes.

There’s no ONE set way to train anyone – youth athletes included – and oftentimes the larger, more pertinent approach is adopting methodologies for LONG-TERM health and fitness.

Not for ego.

Enjoy the read (and be sure to download the FREE guide “How to Reduce the Risk of Injury in Youth Athletes” below).

Copyright: spotpoint74 / 123RF Stock Photo

Why Kids Should “Cheat” the Deadlift

Sumo is cheating.

We hear that a lot. Mostly from a certain uppity corner of the powerlifting community and mostly owing to its shortened range of motion compared to the conventional deadlift.

Well, we love it. The Brand X Method™ loves the sumo deadlift.

And we’re often asked about this great love affair.

So yeah, why sumo?

  • When was the last time you set up in a conventional stance to pick up a cinder block, sack of dog food, a child? Never. The sumo stance is how we pick up stuff in the real world.

  • Over the course of 15 years, we have found that kids can learn a safe sumo setup more quickly and maintain a neutral spine throughout the movement more consistently. Could it be because our bodies are designed to pick up heavy stuff in this position?
  • The conventional stance requires more work from the spinal erectors (see, e.g., here). Should the erectors fatigue or fail under load—or be left holding the bag so to speak by primary mover fatigue or poor technique—the spine is at risk of injury. We train kids, which by definition means we’re training mostly beginner and intermediate lifters. The responsible approach is to minimize that risk.
  • Powerlifting guru Louie Simmons has said that training wide supports narrow applications but not the opposite. At Brand X – The Lab, we’ve seen people improve their conventional deadlift after training exclusively sumo—but, yeah, you guessed it—not the opposite.

To say the sumo stance is functional is to lose its significance in all the buzz around that overused label.

But it is functional.

Profoundly so.

The sumo stance is everywhere in the everyday world, from the backyard to the ball field, from the garage to the library.

When we train sumo, we enhance physical literacy, we improve our ability to engage with the environment. The more we are able to interact with the world and others around us in positive and rewarding ways, the healthier and happier we—and everyone around us—can be.

Imagine a world like that.

We do.

Never Say Never

So am I saying that we never train conventional?

Of course not.

We program conventional deadlift variations all of the time for our experienced lifters:

Single-leg dumbbell, deficits, rack pulls, RDLs… Conventional deadlifts make for great accessory and supplemental work.

Some of our experienced kids are committed competitive powerlifters. Our sports-specific programming includes conventional deadlifts because it makes sense to identify which position the kid best pulls from.

Is this a contradiction?

No.

We’re talking sport.

We’re talking kids who want to lift the most weight possible. That doesn’t mean we simply let the kid pull conventional. A TBXM™ program for a kid who can stand up with more weight in the conventional stance than in the sumo position also includes exercises that support the conventional stance to ensure that safety and efficiency are maximized during training and competition.

The conventional stance deadlift transfers to the power clean, a staple power-building exercise for The Brand X Method™.

Let’s optimize.

Occasionally anthropometry such as long femurs, long torso, and comparatively short arms call for us to explore a conventional stance for plateau-busting insights.

Individualizing our program is essential to our mission.

Frankly, variation is a fairly conventional strength training principle. And therein lies one of the great things about The Brand X Method™—our principles are sound; they are long-established, evidence-based, and proven. With that kind of foundation, we can forever explore and evolve best practices for teaching kids how to move more safely and efficiently for fitness, sport, and life.

If You Ain’t Cheating You Ain’t Trying

The Brand X Method™ wrangles with the constant tension between the goals of youth sport and the goals of our program.

The former wants high performance at all times (e.g., lifting the most weight, throwing the hardest, running the fastest) while we want to see the discovery, participation, and enjoyment of sport and other physical activities for all time.


Thing is, the tension seems to come from the sports side and is almost entirely driven by an over-reliance on sports-specific training and a lack of knowledge about how our program should be viewed as essential to sports-specific training rather than some kind of extraneous “activity.”

We know that high performance and lifelong physical activity based on consistently good movement don’t have to be mutually exclusive.

Our proof is in the USA Powerlifting—California state record book where our kids and teens (and even some adults) hold more than 100 records.

Imagine that—prioritizing safety and efficiency in the form of consistently excellent (and natural) movement yields record holders, champions, and national qualifiers, most of whom stepped onto the platform just for kicks.

High performance is a by-product of The Brand X Method™.

Sumo. What they call cheating, we call common sense.

What they snicker at, we find advantageous.

Efficient.

Safe.

Long-term.

We want our kids able to lift when they’re 40 50, 60, beyond.

A youth fitness program that is not thinking about lifetime fitness is not thinking period.

We’ll continue to train the most efficient, safest movement built on naturally intended, functional motor patterns and positions. We’ll continue to encourage kids to try different sports and then provide them the best strength and conditioning we can to keep them strong, fast, and durable. We’ll continue to imagine a better future for our kids. And we’ll continue to gather the medals, trophies, and records that come with it.

They say cheating. We say scoreboard, baby.

About the Author

Dan Edelman is a Brand X Youth Coach and has been a member of The Brand X Method staff for nearly a decade, principally as staff writer and editor. He is the current Director of Marketing & Communications and is co-owner of R Town Strength & Wellness – A Brand X Method Training Center in San Diego County, California.

About the The Brand X Method

Since 2004, we have been driven by a relentless pursuit of best practices in youth training. Our focus on motor pattern training and physical literacy enhancement optimizes kids’ fitness and elevates their athleticism. We help protect kids and teens against sports injury, boost their sports performance, and push back against the forces behind obesity.

The mastery, confidence, and motivation that kids develop in our gyms are the ingredients of freedom and fearlessness. The Brand X Method™ instills the essence of adventure, passion, and joy in kids and teens when playing their favorite sports, trying new things, and tackling life’s challenges so they can step out of our gyms knowing they can do whatever they set out to do.

Free Download: Brand X Youth Coaches Guide & Assessment

Contact Email: info@thebrandxmethod.com

The post Why Kids Should Cheat the Deadlift appeared first on Tony Gentilcore.

Categories: Feeds

How Video can Improve your TGU: Videoception

https://www.strongfirst.com/blog/ - Tue, 12/18/2018 - 07:00

In simple terms, proprioception is the sense of knowing where you are and what you are doing. And the get-up is the perfect pattern to help train and challenge it. But with so many moving parts and our eyes on the load overhead, it’s hard to know—to really know—if we’ve stacked the load optimally. Good enough can be the enemy of great. So how can we work on those fine details without a coach guiding us? A virtual eye can help.

“There are three classes of people: those who see. Those who see when they are shown. Those who do not see.”—Leonardo da Vinci

Everyone knows Leonardo was both artist and inventor. But the Florentine genius was also an accomplished architect for the Medici and the Borgia. In his work for the military of the time, he knew the key to building strong structures lay in the proper distribution of forces. In particular, he knew that straight lines are almost always stronger than broken lines and angles.

The get-up is one of those exercises where structure is key. With the weight supported overhead throughout the movement, it is the careful distribution of forces that provides the opportunity to perform this skill safely and efficiently while progressively increasing the challenge.

Structure and Stability

Bones provide the structure. Muscles stabilize. Don’t confuse one for the other.

As trainers, our eyes are key in helping a student structurally align those bones throughout the get-up stages to minimize the muscular effort needed to stabilize the kettlebell. But how to improve our get-up when no other trainer is available to give us feedback? How to get ready for an SFG certification or re-certification? How do we ensure great technique when demonstrating? How can we own every bit of the movement pattern when our goal is to work on a heavier bell for a Simple & Sinister protocol?

Unless we are practicing unloaded, or “naked” get-ups, mirrors are not a good option. For safety reasons and as one of our StrongFirst standards, our eyes should be on the kettlebell for most of the exercise, especially when we are closer to the floor—precisely when the structural alignment is the most challenging to achieve. A mirror encourages looking elsewhere.

Enter the Videoception

From Leonardo’s quote above, we want to be “those who see.” Interestingly, video means “I see” in Latin. So, video-assisted proprioception, or videoception, is a tool that every trainer and practitioner should master. I’m not talking about the typical practice videos seen on Instagram or Facebook. I‘m talking about using a software application to study snapshots of the get-up to fine-tune alignments and distribution of forces. Sounds geeky? It’s not (well, maybe a little). But it’s a simple 4-step process:

  1. Film yourself doing your get-up. Carefully plan your shooting angles as they are critical—more on that later.
  2. Superimpose lines on your video to check how gravity affects the weight you are carrying overhead. Appreciate that even subtle improvements can yield great results.
  3. Repeat the skill and adjust your position according to your observations. Focus on how it feels to improve your proprioception of what the optimal movement or placement should be.
  4. Repeat these three steps until you have optimized your movement.

Choose a good video analysis app or software* that allows you to draw the appropriate lines of force and keep them superimposed with your body throughout the get-up, or at least the different steps of the movement. See the footnotes for a few suggestions.

If you’re using photos instead, a simple photo-editing program will allow you to draw any kind of line connecting main joints (shoulders, hips, wrists, etc.).

StrongFirst-TGU-Tall-Sit-Comparison

Smile, you’re on Camera

The key is finding the best angle(s) to shoot those videos. Think about the feedback you seek. Some alignments are more critical than others. Do you think you lose structural alignment when going from standing to lunging? Position the camera or smartphone at your side. If you are more concerned about the elbow-to-hand transition, consider shooting from behind, with the camera closer to the ground. Look for the desirable straight line between the kettlebell, your wrist, your shoulder and your opposite sit bone that is supporting the load.

In the beginning, bell down. Execute the get-up slowly, pausing at every step to clearly analyze the movement on screen. The goal is not to capture what you do when you know you are being watched but the patterns you gravitate towards more naturally. Candid rather than rehearsed camera. You’ll probably need a few takes to find the right camera height and angle for each step, and to relax. Resist asking someone else to move around you with the camera as it will introduce camera shake that makes the feedback less reliable. Instead, leave it in a fixed and stable position, ideally on a tripod. It will allow you to experiment with fewer variables and speed up your learning.

StrongFirst-TGU-Windmill-Comparison-Alignment

StrongFirst-TGU-Tall-Kneeling-Comparison-of-Alignment

Also, and from a quiet professional perspective, resist posting your personal coaching video on social media, mixed in with cats and bloopers. It’s a tool for your own improvement. Use it that way. It is also an excellent tool to help your students improve their technique, access their strength or increase their feeling of safety. Many of them cannot feel when they are out of alignment. Use the visual feedback to supplement the drills and cues you already provide.

Stay tuned for a follow-up article, where I explore how outlining and framing improves your get-up.

Give videoception a try and let us know what you learned from it. Share your thoughts, experiences, and comments on our StrongFirst online forum.

*Video software and apps you can try: Coach’s Eye (for iPhone), ObjectusVideo (for Mac) or their equivalent for PC (MotionPro) and Android (PowerChalk).

 

The post How Video can Improve your TGU: Videoception appeared first on StrongFirst.

Categories: Feeds

Sprinting Mechanics – How to Run Faster: Paul Aanonson

http://iyca.org/feed/ - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 16:01

Coaching Sprinting Mechanics must not be ignored in speed training!

SPEED’, the buzzword in the world of sports. Those who have mastered the art of sprinting dominate those who have yet to develop it. Speed wins, every time.

Top speed sprinting is one the most complex, high-velocity human movements in sports. Top speed means 10+ yards after acceleration. Sprinting is a skill and it CAN be learned. To coach a skill, you must first seek to understand the movement and then master the mechanics.

True speed can be an elusive skill to master, and as a result, is often not strongly emphasized in programming. All too often, I hear the phrase, ‘you can’t coach speed’. This statement is likely made because many coaches simply don’t know how to train speed, never mastered the skill themselves, don’t seek to understand its full value or have never been properly educated on how to include proper sprinting mechanics and athletic movement in their coaching. More familiar methods, such as strength training, provide visible weight room results and PRs that look good on paper and pass the ‘eye test,’ but don’t always translate to the field. An athlete with impressive weight room stats, who can’t move quickly and efficiently, will not succeed on the field.

Why does learning sprinting mechanics matter?

As coaches, we need to create well-rounded programs that focus on all aspects of athletic development. Sprinting is a pillar of sports performance. The foundation for ALL my performance training is ‘Building Better Athletes, Not Weight Room All-Stars’.

Teaching Sprinting MechanicsWhen developing athleticism, one question must be answered. What type of movements are performed during the sport and how can we develop speed, power and explosiveness within these skills? Once we determine this, then we can program to improve movement skills, like sprinting, with drills and exercises focused on mechanics, mobility, power and strength.

Unfortunately, lost in the obsession of building bigger and stronger athletes, is the mastery of skills like sprinting, jumping, cutting and improving overall movement. An athlete’s ability to squat 400 lbs (even if the bar speed is explosive), only matters if they can actually apply their strength and power to on-field movements. If it doesn’t transfer, it doesn’t matter.

I’m certainly not here to say that strength doesn’t matter. Strength training is undoubtedly another pillar of athletic development. Speed and strength go hand in hand to create a successful athlete. Instead, I’m here to challenge and bring awareness to the amount of energy and importance our industry places on strength. Think about the amount of training time that is allocated to learning Olympic lifts like the power clean. Compare that to the amount of time spent on coaching and developing movements like sprinting mechanics. One skill (sprinting) is performed on every play of every game, and one is not (i.e. power cleans). If the time dedicated to learning how to properly move and sprint does not outweigh, or at least equal, the time dedicated to learning Olympic lifts, we are failing our athletes.

Learning how to sprint requires breaking down the movement into steps (as seen in the video below), developing good habits and efficient fluid movements. SPEED CAN BE LEARNED by training posture, body position and mechanics and utilizing specific drills, along with teaching athletes how to efficiently produce force during the action of sprinting. Drills help athletes simplify the complex skill, allowing them to focus on just one aspect.

The goal when coaching sprinting mechanics is not perfection. Every athlete will have slightly different quirks and movements, but the question to always ask is whether or not they are efficient efficiently.  Perfection is the enemy, while efficiency is the ally. Everything from how and where the foot lands, to the position of the head, must be performed with intent and purpose. Most athletes never learn to run correctly and the result creates bad habits during their developmental years. It is our job as coaches to determine if they need to relearn the skill of sprinting or just improve a few aspects, then communicate it with simple cues during speed workouts.

Not every athlete is born with equal natural abilities and each individual has a genetic ceiling. As coaches and mentors, it’s our responsibility to help athletes reach their full potential by providing the tools, confidence, and skills to reach peak performance on the field. I have successfully coached the art of sprinting to well over 2,000 athletes. It is a process, it takes time, and you must be confident and able to break down movements and sprinting mechanics for each individual.

Teaching proper sprinting mechanics does not have to be intimidating. Take the time to fully understand the movement and break down the individual steps. Like any other skill, the more you practice, the more confident you’ll become coaching, cueing and helping your athletes develop into proficient, powerful sprinters.

Along with the Simple Speed Coach ‘How to Sprint’ video, I’ve included a simple overview to help you follow my 9 coaching cues shown in the video.

How to Sprint Video Overview:

Step 1: Neutral Head: Chin neutral, eyes up.

Step 2: Sprint Posture: Neutral pelvis w/ forward lean, rod from ear through hip.

Step 3: Hip Flexion: Thigh slightly below parallel to the ground.

Step 4: Knee Extension / Flight Phase: Violent motion of leg extending towards the ground.

Step 5: Ground Anticipation: How the foot strikes the ground.

Step 6: COG: Where the foot lands.

Step 7: Recovery Leg: Action of the leg as it drives up and in front of the body.

Step 8: Arm Action: Powerful and efficient arm swing.

Step 9: Relax: Utilize only the muscles needed for fluid motion, breathe.

*STRIDE TO TURNOVER RATIO

Stride is determined by recovery leg action (Step 7) into Hip Flexion (Step 3). Turnover is the velocity through the leg cycle.

Teaching sprinting mechanics can be an incredibly enjoyable and fruitful process as you develop athletes.  Take the time to thoroughly understand sprinting mechanics before you begin your instruction, and enjoy watching your athletes get faster and faster.

 

Paul AanonsonPaul Aanonson, MS, CSCS, FMS – Paul is the owner of Simple Speed Coach and has directed the sports performance program for North Colorado Sports Medicine since 2008, training over 2,500 athletes. He oversees the return to sport rehab program and has mentored and prepared over 130 collegiate graduates through his internship program. Aanonson graduated from South Dakota State University with a B.S. in Exercise Science and received a M.S. in Sport Administration from The University of Northern Colorado. He was a four sport all-state athlete in high school and a FCS All-American return specialist for the South Dakota State University football team.

 

For even more detailed information about sprinting mechanics and speed development, check out the IYCA Certified Speed & Agility Specialist course.  The CSAS is the most comprehensive and scientifically sound speed certification in the athletic development profession.  It truly prepares you to teach and develop speed.  Click on the image below to learn more.

speed & agility certification

 

The post Sprinting Mechanics – How to Run Faster: Paul Aanonson appeared first on IYCA - The International Youth Conditioning Association.

Categories: Feeds

Announcement: The Intensive IV

http://www.billhartman.net/blog/feed/ - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 15:02

Are you ready for round IV?

The first three Intensives were outstanding experiences. Each was unique as the curriculum is driven by the attendees.

As always, we are keeping this small to maximize the interactivity. Only 8 professionals will be selected from the application process.

If you applied to The Intensive I-III before and would like to attend, please fill out a new application. Two attendees from The Intensive III had applied to previously and got in.

The When and Where

February 21-14 at IFAST (and Casa de Hartman) in Indianapolis, Indiana. We start at 8pm on Thursday the 21st (unless you can make dinner at 6:30 at my favorite Mexican restaurant). We go until Sunday, February 24th at about noon. When we get hungry, we eat. When we get tired, we sleep.

The Who

Up to eight (8) professionals (It is NOT for students) who:

Are comfortable with contributing ideas, asking, and answering questions.

Have an understanding of foundational movement-based anatomy and exercise/training concepts.

Want to challenge and help others professionals improve.

Understand the value of a coach and seek a learning network of individuals with common concerns, interests, and goals but different backgrounds.

Selfishly, it’s for me. I enjoy what I do, and I enjoy sharing ideas and interacting with bright, motivated people from whom I too can learn.

The What

A fun, open, engaging, and challenging environment

Guided, focused effort over three days

Develop a principles-based approach

Examining a model of human movement from micro to macro

Assessment processes from a passive to a dynamic environment

Cuing, coaching, decision-making, intervention strategies, and programming

Ongoing discussion and conversation over dinner at Casa de Hartman

Enhance and evolve your personal information capture and learning system

Share knowledge as part of an ongoing professional network

Follow-up mentorship to assure ongoing progress

Train at IFAST

The eight individuals will be selected via the application process as quickly as possible. Attendees will be notified by January 15.

How Much?

It is $699 to attend in addition to your travel expenses. Your food is taken care of.

The Intensive IV Application

If you haven’t done so, please get on the mentorship list below to be notified of any changes, opportunities, and updates.

The post Announcement: The Intensive IV appeared first on Personal Fitness & Professional Mentorship.

Categories: Feeds

Announcement: The Intensive IV

http://www.billhartman.net/blog/feed/ - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 14:36

Are you ready for round IV?

The first three Intensives were outstanding experiences. Each was unique as the curriculum is driven by the attendees.

As always, we are keeping this small to maximize the interactivity. Only 8 professionals will be selected from the application process.

If you applied to The Intensive I-III before and would like to attend, please fill out a new application. Two attendees from The Intensive III had applied to previously and got in.

The When and Where

February 21-14 at IFAST (and Casa de Hartman) in Indianapolis, Indiana. We start at 8pm on Thursday the 21st (unless you can make dinner at 6:30 at my favorite Mexican restaurant). We go until Sunday, February 24th at about noon. When we get hungry, we eat. When we get tired, we sleep.

The Who

Up to eight (8) professionals (It is NOT for students) who:

Are comfortable with contributing ideas, asking, and answering questions.

Have an understanding of foundational movement-based anatomy and exercise/training concepts.

Want to challenge and help others professionals improve.

Understand the value of a coach and seek a learning network of individuals with common concerns, interests, and goals but different backgrounds.

Selfishly, it’s for me. I enjoy what I do, and I enjoy sharing ideas and interacting with bright, motivated people from whom I too can learn.

The What

A fun, open, engaging, and challenging environment

Guided, focused effort over three days

Develop a principles-based approach

Examining a model of human movement from micro to macro

Assessment processes from a passive to a dynamic environment

Cuing, coaching, decision-making, intervention strategies, and programming

Ongoing discussion and conversation over dinner at Casa de Hartman

Enhance and evolve your personal information capture and learning system

Share knowledge as part of an ongoing professional network

Follow-up mentorship to assure ongoing progress

Train at IFAST

The eight individuals will be selected via the application process as quickly as possible. Attendees will be notified by January 15.

How Much?

It is $699 to attend in addition to your travel expenses. Your food is taken care of.

The Intensive IV Application

If you haven’t done so, please get on the mentorship list below to be notified of any changes, opportunities, and updates.

The post Announcement: The Intensive IV appeared first on Personal Fitness & Professional Mentorship.

Categories: Feeds

Don’t miss out on my T=R holiday savings!

http://charlieweingroff.com/feed/ - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 12:25

All of my DVDs are on sale (including $70 off T=R3), and as a bundle for $347 (save $184), all with free shipping!

Items shipped in the continental U.S. by Wednesday, December 19, 2018 should arrive in time for the holidays next week!

(Holiday pricing expires December 31, 2018.)

The post Don’t miss out on my T=R holiday savings! appeared first on Charlie Weingroff.

Categories: Feeds

The Forgotten Component of Progressing in the Weight Room

http://www.tonygentilcore.com/feed/ - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 11:56

It’s popular nowadays for people to brag about how hard their workouts are.

And I don’t mean “hard” as in “man, I’d rather jump into a shark’s mouth than do that squat session again” hard.

No, for whatever reason, it’s become more important to one-up each other, to champion shenanigans over actual progress in the gym:

Person #1:I could barely walk to my car after my workout today.”

Person #2:Pfftt, whatever. I threw up today during my workout. It was awesome.

Person #3:Oh yeah, well, after my workout I couldn’t feel the right side of my face.

Progress, it seems, has more to do with how close to a medical emergency someone can get than it is actually seeing tangible improvements in their lifts.

Copyright: fxquadro / 123RF Stock Photo

The Forgotten Component of Progress

To be fair…

My hoity toity introduction wasn’t meant to imply I’m against trainees pushing the envelop in their training. I’ve often said, somewhat facetiously, that lifting weights isn’t supposed to tickle.

I love when people work hard in the gym.

But there’s a stark contrast between someone working hard during a workout and them going out of their way to routinely surpass their ability to recover from said workout.

via GIPHY

In a very much watered down explanation, “progress” can be applied, measured, or attributed to the following factors:

  • Doing more sets/reps of a particular exercise.
  • Adding more load to a particular exercise.
  • Manipulating rest periods and/or tempo of a particular exercise.
  • Changing “mode” of an exercise (I.e., switching from Trap Bar Deadlift to Conventional)
  • Adding physics into the equation (I.e, moving center of mass further up and away from base of support. I.e., switching from Dumbbell Reverse Lunges to Barbell Reverse Lunges).
  • Can your pecs cut diamonds?1

In Short: Are you making a concerted effort to “do more work?” What’s more, are you able to do so over the course of weeks, months, years?

Your ability to progress long-term is directly correlated with how well you’re able to recover from your workouts (via purposeful fluctuations in training volume, as well as ensuring ample sleep, calories, and hydration). It has nothing to do with one’s prowess at regurgitating their Quinoa & Kale power salad from a few hours ago.

But I’ll get off my high-horse and get to the point.

“Feel” Matters

Last year I started working with another local coach here in Boston. She’s co-owner of a KB-centric gym and  Strong First certified, but she wanted to hire me to help her get more proficient with the barbell lifts (specifically the deadlift) as well as help her prepare for the Strong First barbell course.

Jessica was already pretty freakin strong when she started.

When we tested her deadlift she hit 300 lbs; a number many guys would love to hit.

However, it didn’t “feel” or look easy.

She had a few technical glitches I wanted to iron out.

We had ten weeks. During that time my only goal was to clean up her technique in an effort to make 300 lbs feel easier.

I knew that if we worked on cementing her technique, making each repetition look (and feel) pristine, and getting her into better positions to be able to express her (true) strength…we’d likely see an improvement when she re-tested her 1 rep-max at the conclusion of the certification course.

Conventional wisdom would dictate that in order to get her to lift more weight we’d have to focus on progressive overload – more sets, more reps, heavier load, did she destroy the back of her pants, etc.

That’s not the route I took.

via GIPHY

Over the course of ten weeks we never touched a weight above 265 lbs.

35 lbs under her best lift.

Instead, like I said, we focused on improving position(s) and making sure we trained with loads that allowed her to marinate in impeccable and FAF reps.2.

Fast Forward Ten Weeks

Before she left for her certification weekend we re-tested 300 lbs.

Few things have made me cry – saying my vows to my wife during our wedding, holding my son for the first time, watching Rose let go of Jack at the end of Titanic, flipping my omelet and not breaking it.

Okay, I cry all the time.

Jessica’s deadlift brought a tear to my eye it looked so good.

What was originally a 19 on the Rate of Perceived Exertion scale, looked (and felt) like a 7/8 by the time ten weeks were over.

What’s more, she ended up hitting a PR of 35o lbs that weekend.

*drops the mic.

Progress = Feel, Too

Far too often trainees are quick to add more weight to the bar, or use the concept of more (more sets, reps, load, etc) as the sole metric to gauge progress.

All are important of course, and everyone should remain cognizant of them.

However, don’t be so quick to underestimate the value of staying put and getting more acquainted with a specific weight. If five reps of a certain weight is challenging, even if you can complete five reps, stay there.

Stay there until it feels less effortful. Many people are too quick to add weight at the expense of actually owning it. More to the point, I much prefer someone leave a session feeling refreshed and that they could do more rather than shit their spleen and miss reps on a routine basis.

What good is that going to do?

Easy training is good training.

That’s progression too.

The post The Forgotten Component of Progressing in the Weight Room appeared first on Tony Gentilcore.

Categories: Feeds

[VIDEO] How to Use the FMS with Your Training Program

http://charlieweingroff.com/feed/ - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 10:25

In case you missed it, I made a video where I shared how to use the FMS with your training program:

Using the FMS with YOUR training program: One Shot, One Kill!

http://charlieweingroff.com

Posted by Charlie Weingroff on Tuesday, December 5, 2017

Functional Movement is having a holiday sale where you can save 20% with code INVEST18 on a single online course or bundle two or more online courses for a 30% savings using code BUNDLE18. Click the link below to learn more.

Twitter Photo

The post [VIDEO] How to Use the FMS with Your Training Program appeared first on Charlie Weingroff.

Categories: Feeds

How to Program Your Back Training at The U

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 08:10
Over the past few months, some things in my back training have made a big difference — variations coaches often overlook. Considering paused reps at the chest/stomach, slow eccentrics, scap movements with a rowing motion, and handle/grip variations, back training is limitless.
Categories: Feeds

Credit Card Swipe for These 5 Garage Gym Owner Gifts

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 08:06
Toss that budget sheet into the trash and max your credit card at elitefts.com. Alternatively: Ask Mom for her credit card.
Categories: Feeds

Strength and Conditioning Stuff You Should Read: 12/17/18

https://ericcressey.com/blog - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 06:22

I hope you had a great weekend. We're getting back on an every Monday schedule with this recommended reading. Before I get to it, just a quick reminder that I just announced a new date for my one-day shoulder course. It'll be taking place near Dallas, TX on January 27. You can learn more HERE.

How Rib Cage Positioning Impacts the Pitching Delivery - CSP-MA pitching coordinator Christian Wonders wrote this up last year, and in light of a recent conversation on pitching mechanics, I wanted to bring it back to the forefront.

Fergus Connolly on Winning and Success at Every Level - Fergus is one of the most insightful guys in the sports science world, and this podcast with Mike Robertson is a great example.

The 7 Keys to Longevity with Dr. Jonny Bowden - Jason Ferruggia interviewed Dr. Bowden on his up-to-date thoughts on a variety of topics: nutrition, sleep, stress, and several other factors.

Top Tweet of the Week

Ulnar deviation w/the steel club. If you’re looking for forearm drills for pitchers, here’s a good complement to the pronation/supination exercises I’ve posted in the past. Flexor carpi ulnaris protects the ulnar collateral ligament against valgus stress; this targets it. pic.twitter.com/7Ru1mfDA2C

— Eric Cressey (@EricCressey) December 13, 2018

Top Instagram Post of the Week

        View this post on Instagram                  

Here is an awesome cadaver photo to demonstrate just how little wiggle room there is when dealing with the shoulder. The glenohumeral (ball and socket) joint is maintained in such a small window that it’s possible to say that impingement is a physiological norm. These challenges are even more extreme in the case of structural adaptations and pathology. In other words, we can’t leave any stones unturned in our quest for shoulder health, particularly when one’s sport demands involve high forces and extreme ranges of motion. Anatomy never lies. #cspfamily #Repost @chicagosportsdoc with @get_repost ・・・ Rotator cuff anatomy - A tear into one of these tendons is a common cause of pain and disability among adults. Each year, almost 2 million people in the United States visit their doctors because of a rotator cuff problem.

A post shared by Eric Cressey (@ericcressey) on Dec 2, 2018 at 7:39am PST

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Categories: Feeds

Precision Nutrition Coaching: January 2019 Women’s Finalists. Help us give away $125,000!

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/feed - Mon, 12/17/2018 - 06:00

Only a year ago, these 20 women were overweight, out of shape, stressed, and almost out of hope. Now, after 12 months of Precision Nutrition Coaching, they’ve transformed their health, their bodies, and their lives.

They also have the chance to take home part of the $125,000 in prize money we’ve once again committed to our latest round of top clients. Scroll through these amazing photos and vote for the finalist whose transformation inspires you most.

++

Every year in Precision Nutrition Coaching, we help men and women from around the world dramatically improve their eating habits and lifestyle.

They lose weight, gain strength, and completely transform their bodies, health, fitness, and lives.

We also give them a big, motivating goal to shoot for: $250,000 in cash prizes.

Consider it an antidote to the “you must suffer and feel guilty to get in shape” message you typically get from the fitness industry.

See, women come to us wanting big changes:

  • They want to lose weight and shed body fat.
  • They want to make healthier food choices, consistently.
  • They want to feel at ease, instead of stressed out, when eating.
  • They want to feel confident and comfortable in their own skin.
  • They want to start doing all the awesome things they’ve always wanted to do, but thought they couldn’t.

Above all, they want to become the fittest, strongest, healthiest versions of themselves.

In our experience, big, inspiring, life-changing goals like these are a whole lot easier to achieve when there’s a huge bonus at stake.

So, every six months, we divvy up a big pot of prize money for the best transformations among our male and female clients.

For the current group—which started in January 2018 and is wrapping up now—we’ve committed $125,000.

And right now, we need your help to choose our Women’s Grand Prize winner.

Help choose our Women’s Grand Prize winner (Top prize = $25,000)

The women below started their Precision Nutrition Coaching journey in all shapes and sizes, and they hail from all parts of the globe.

They’re a diverse group with one thing in common: They finally achieved the bodies and health they’ve wanted for a long time, and they’re confident they’ll stay this way for good.

How’d they do it?

No crash diets. No Biggest Loser-type bootcamps. And no full-time chefs.

Just research-based nutrition and lifestyle habits practiced daily with personalized help from our expert coaches.

To vote for the woman you think should win the $25,000 Grand Prize, scroll through the photos below. Make your choice by clicking the “Vote for Finalist” button under the one you think achieved the best transformation.

But please don’t stop there. Once you’ve seen all the finalists and selected your #1 choice, scroll down to the bottom of this post.

At the bottom you’ll need to verify your choice. To do this, click the “Place your vote” button. This will log your vote and help us make our decision.

Thanks for your help!

Finalist #1 Lost 40 lbs and 33 total inches! Age: 38 years
Weight Lost: 40 lbs (from 183 lbs to 143 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 33 inches (from 227 inches to 194 inches)
Vote for Finalist #1

Finalist #1 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #2 Lost 57 lbs and 37 total inches! Age: 67 years
Weight Lost: 57 lbs (from 204 lbs to 147 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 37 inches (from 249 inches to 212 inches)
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Finalist #2 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #3 Lost 54 lbs and 43 total inches! Age: 42 years
Weight Lost: 54 lbs (from 182 lbs to 128 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 43 inches (from 234 inches to 191 inches)
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Finalist #4 Lost 37 lbs and 28 total inches! Age: 45 years
Weight Lost: 37 lbs (from 189 lbs to 152 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 28 inches (from 238 inches to 210 inches)
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Finalist #5 Lost 52 lbs and 44 total inches! Age: 49 years
Weight Lost: 52 lbs (from 201 lbs to 149 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 44 inches (from 262 inches to 218 inches)
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Finalist #6 Lost 22 lbs and 19 total inches! Age: 26 years
Weight Lost: 22 lbs (from 163 lbs to 141 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 19 inches (from 223 inches to 204 inches)
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After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #7 Lost 32 lbs and 26 total inches! Age: 60 years
Weight Lost: 32 lbs (from 148 lbs to 116 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 26 inches (from 217 inches to 191 inches)
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After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #8 Lost 16 lbs and 25 total inches! Age: 37 years
Weight Lost: 16 lbs (from 121 lbs to 105 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 25 inches (from 207 inches to 182 inches)
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Finalist #8 selected!

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Finalist #9 Lost 41 lbs and 48 total inches! Age: 48 years
Weight Lost: 41 lbs (from 229 lbs to 188 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 48 inches (from 265 inches to 217 inches)
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Finalist #9 selected!

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Finalist #10 Lost 17 lbs and 24 total inches! Age: 38 years
Weight Lost: 17 lbs (from 141 lbs to 124 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 24 inches (from 206 inches to 182 inches)
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Finalist #10 selected!

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Finalist #11 Lost 15 lbs and 18 total inches! Age: 62 years
Weight Lost: 15 lbs (from 142 lbs to 127 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 18 inches (from 218 inches to 200 inches)
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Finalist #11 selected!

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Finalist #12 Lost 37 lbs and 33 total inches! Age: 34 years
Weight Lost: 37 lbs (from 171 lbs to 134 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 33 inches (from 240 inches to 207 inches)
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Finalist #12 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #13 Lost 32 lbs and 31 total inches! Age: 54 years
Weight Lost: 32 lbs (from 224 lbs to 192 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 31 inches (from 260 inches to 229 inches)
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Finalist #13 selected!

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Finalist #14 Lost 29 lbs and 27 total inches! Age: 70 years
Weight Lost: 29 lbs (from 164 lbs to 135 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 27 inches (from 230 inches to 203 inches)
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Finalist #14 selected!

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Finalist #15 Lost 19 lbs and 19 total inches! Age: 48 years
Weight Lost: 19 lbs (from 162 lbs to 143 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 19 inches (from 226 inches to 207 inches)
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Finalist #15 selected!

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Finalist #16 Lost 23 lbs and 32 total inches! Age: 33 years
Weight Lost: 23 lbs (from 180 lbs to 157 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 32 inches (from 235 inches to 203 inches)
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Finalist #16 selected!

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Finalist #17 Lost 24 lbs and 19 total inches! Age: 62 years
Weight Lost: 24 lbs (from 141 lbs to 117 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 19 inches (from 209 inches to 190 inches)
Vote for Finalist #17

Finalist #17 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #18 Lost 20 lbs and 19 total inches! Age: 62 years
Weight Lost: 20 lbs (from 134 lbs to 114 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 19 inches (from 201 inches to 182 inches)
Vote for Finalist #18

Finalist #18 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #19 Lost 26 lbs and 20 total inches! Age: 29 years
Weight Lost: 26 lbs (from 154 lbs to 128 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 20 inches (from 221 inches to 201 inches)
Vote for Finalist #19

Finalist #19 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Finalist #20 Lost 13 lbs and 14 total inches! Age: 41 years
Weight Lost: 13 lbs (from 115 lbs to 102 lbs)
Total Inches Lost: 14 inches (from 186 inches to 172 inches)
Vote for Finalist #20

Finalist #20 selected!

After reviewing all the finalists - you can change your vote at any time - click "Place your vote" at the bottom of this page to record your choice.

Confirm your choice for the Women’s $25,000 Grand Prize winner

When confirming your vote, it’s important to remember that we’re not rewarding the best bodies per se. We’re rewarding the most incredible transformations.

In Precision Nutrition Coaching, we certainly don’t expect folks to start off looking like fitness models. Heck, we don’t even expect folks to end up looking like fitness models.

We’re looking for winners who’ve made the most dramatic changes in their own bodies, starting from wherever they were at the beginning.

That’s because our coaching is for men and women of all shapes and sizes. And your vote should reflect who you think achieved the most dramatic changes over the last 12 months.

Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll. Want to transform your body like these women did?

Most people know that regular movement, eating well, sleep, and stress management are important for getting the body and health they want. Yet they need help applying that knowledge in the context of their busy, sometimes stressful lives.

Over the past 15 years, we’ve used the Precision Nutrition Coaching method to help over 100,000 clients lose fat, get stronger, and improve their health… for the long-term… no matter what challenges they’re dealing with.

It’s also why we work with health, fitness, and wellness professionals (through our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs) to teach them how to coach their own clients through the same challenges.

Interested in Precision Nutrition Coaching? Join the presale list; you’ll save up to 54% and secure a spot 24 hours early.

We’ll be opening up spots in our next Precision Nutrition Coaching on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019.

If you’re interested in coaching and want to find out more, I’d encourage you to join our presale list below. Being on the list gives you two special advantages.

  • You’ll pay less than everyone else. At Precision Nutrition we like to reward the most interested and motivated people because they always make the best clients. Join the presale list and you’ll save up to 54% off the general public price, which is the lowest price we’ve ever offered.
  • You’re more likely to get a spot. To give clients the personal care and attention they deserve, we only open up the program twice a year. Last time we opened registration, we sold out within minutes. By joining the presale list you’ll get the opportunity to register 24 hours before everyone else, increasing your chances of getting in.

If you’re ready to change your body, and your life, with help from the world’s best coaches, this is your chance.

[Note: If your health and fitness are already sorted out, but you’re interested in helping others, check out our Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certification program].

The post Precision Nutrition Coaching: January 2019 Women’s Finalists. Help us give away $125,000! appeared first on Precision Nutrition.

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6 Gifts That'll Make You the World's Best Uncle

https://www.elitefts.com/education/feed - Sun, 12/16/2018 - 01:06
elitefts apparel: The secret to being the best uncle ever. Also, Dave? Do me a huge favor and make some new designs so I can keep this position... I'm running out of options.
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