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Elite Physical Preparation and Sports Performance Training
Updated: 11 hours 8 min ago

Connor Ryan on Training, Therapy, and Working to Blend the Model

Fri, 05/24/2019 - 05:00

Dr. Connor Ryan is currently working with the Arizona Coyotes as the physical therapist and also see’s patients in his own office in North Scottsdale AZ. He finished his undergrad in Exercise Physiology (2010) and then Doctorate in Physical Therapy at the University of Massachusetts Lowell (2013).

Prior to working with the Coyotes he worked at Foothills Sports Medicine Physical Therapy in Gilbert AZ as a staff orthopedic physical therapist and worked as personal trainer and physical therapist working under Charlie Weingroff in NYC at Drive 495.

Connor currently has 2 children ages 1 and 4 with his wife Harmony and he enjoys being a dad, training in the gym, mentoring the youth, sports, music, cooking, and spending time with family and friends.

In this show, Connor and I talk about how essentially dying on a baseball field at age 14 got him started working out, his philosophy and thoughts on blending therapy with physical preparation, and why he’s made such an effort to simplify his model and approach in recent years.

Connor and I touch all the bases on this one, and I really hope you enjoy it!

 

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of this week’s show:

  • The Week That Was
  • Deep Thought – Input = Output
    • What ways are you replenishing your energy stores as a trainer/coach?
    • Example of my day – now how am I going to re-energize myself?
    • Question for you – how can you better match your input to your output?
    • What things give you joy? Replenish your energy? And keep you on your A-game?
  • Interview with “The Mayor” Connor Ryan
    • How almost dying at age 14 got him started working out.
    • His career path, and how he finally ended up in Arizona.
    • Connor’s overarching philosophy as someone who treats patients but also likes to train hard.
    • How his philosophy changes or adapts when we’re talking about pro athletes vs. Average Joe’s.
    • His diagnostic process, and arguably the most important part of the session (HINT: it’s not just taking a bunch of measurements!)
    • The standard findings he sees when we’re talking about hockey players.
    • Connor’s thoughts on better blending PT and training, and how we can better smooth that process so the athlete gets the best possible result.
    • The BIG Question.
    • The always popular lightning round where we talk about how he got his nickname, the books he’s reading right now, what it’s like being a dad, and what’s next for Connor Ryan.

 

Related Links

Books Referenced

 

The Best Protein on the Market Today?

For many years, I simply disregarded the age-old advice of getting liquid protein in either during or after workouts.

Part of this was due to the fact that most had so much crap in them I didn’t want to put them in my body, and others might have been high-quality but tasted absolutely disgusting.

However, if you’re looking for a protein that’s not only high-quality but also tastes amazing, you need to check out Momentous.

I’ve been using Momentous for several months now, and I can tell you it’s hands-down the best tasting protein I’ve ever had. But it’s not just me – I have numerous elite athletes who are very picky with their protein powders, and every one of them raves about how great Momentous protein shakes taste.

And while the taste is amazing, the best part about Momentous is that they’re incredibly transparent with what goes into their product. You never have to worry about a tainted or dirty supplement, as all of their products are NSF and Informed Sport certified.

If you’d like to try Momentous out for yourself, here’s how to do it:

  1. Head over to LiveMomentous.com/Robertson
  2. If you want to try a sample, use the code RobertsonSample
  3. When you’re order to order, use the code Robertson20 to save 20% off your first order!

Regardless of which option you choose, I guarantee once you try Momentous protein shakes, you’ll never go back to anything else!

 

I Want Your Feedback!

What do you like about the show?

What do you hate?

What can I do to make you download every single episode, and share it with all of your friends in the industry?

Drop me a line at mike@robertsontrainingsystems.com and let me know. I’d love to hear from you!

The post Connor Ryan on Training, Therapy, and Working to Blend the Model appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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How to Trap Bar Deadlift

Wed, 05/22/2019 - 05:00

You asked, so I’ve delivered!

These days, the trap bar deadlift (TBDL) is my go-to deadlifting progression for both gen pop clients and athletes alike – and for good reason.

The trap bar is awesome for a few reasons:

  1. The high handles reduce mobility needs, and makes setting-up easier. This combo helps you spare the spine and keep the lower back healthy.
  2. Being inside the bar vs. having the bar in front further reduces potential for injury.
  3. Last but not least, you can load it up fairly quickly and focus on getting STRONG!

Quite simply if you want an awesome deadlift variation that you can start using ASAP with your clients and athletes, be sure to check out this video!

Now that you’ve seen the video, here are a few quick notes (I’m going to write it as if I’m coaching you):

  • Get your ribcage stacked on your pelvis. This will often involve the cue “soft knees,” but could also require you to move your pelvis forward or backward to get it into the appropriate position.
  • Reach long and shift your hips back. Even though this is a trap bar deadlift, we still want it to look and feel like a deadlift. Pushing the hips back allows you to actively load the glutes and hamstrings.
  • Feel the whole foot. I want balance throughout the rep, but especially at the beginning. Even though the hips are back, you still want the weight distributed evenly across the foot.
  • PUSH! Once you’re locked into position, don’t over think it. Look the spine in (imagine it’s welded straight) and then PUSH using your legs and hips all the way to the top.

Give these cues a shot next time you’re in the gym. I think it will really help you dial in your performance!

All the best,
MR

The post How to Trap Bar Deadlift appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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7 BIG Mistakes I Made in the Fitness Industry

Fri, 05/17/2019 - 05:00

Look let’s be honest here…

…very people like to admit their mistakes.

And perhaps more importantly, even fewer want to be vulnerable and share them with the world!

But that’s exactly what I’m doing in this episode. I’m giving you a sneak peak into some of the biggest mistakes I’ve made over the years.

And perhaps most importantly, I’m going to give you specific advice can apply to make sure you learn from my mistakes and fast track your own progress.

Let’s do this!

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of what I covered in this week’s show:

  1. Not Showing Up on Time
    • What it truly means to be “On Time” – and why “On Time” is really late!
  2. Not Get Coaching and Mentoring Earlier
    • Perhaps the single biggest reason you’re not seeing the success you want – and how to address it ASAP!
  3. Thinking I Knew Everything
    • Why “I Don’t Know” are three of the most powerful words you can say (and how to use this as a point of learning vs. being a bad thing)
  4. Confusing Book Knowledge with Street Knowledge
    • The MASSIVE difference between book smarts and street smarts
    • How’s there’s absolute NO replacement for getting reps
  5. Not Realizing My Own Training Biases
    • Are you able to differentiate and distinguish YOUR training, versus what your clients/athletes should be doing?
  6. Overemphasizing on Physical Quality
    • And why overemphasizing any one training quality is a recipe for disaster
  7. Not Writing Well-Rounded Programs
    • The bicycle spoke method of writing balanced programs

 

The post 7 BIG Mistakes I Made in the Fitness Industry appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Learn to Control Anterior Pelvic Tilt with THIS Exercise

Wed, 05/15/2019 - 05:00

Many clients and athletes have some degree of anterior pelvic tilt (APT).

And while APT isn’t the awful disease or malady we once thought, the fact of the matter is if it goes unchecked, bad things tend to happen.

As such, as a trainer, coach or athlete, you need tools in the toolbox to help you control it.

One of my personal favorite exercises is the bench hamstring curl. In many ways it’s an entry-level exercise, but it’s fantastic for learning to “feel” the hamstrings, and working to get the pelvis back into a more neutral position.

Give this exercise a shot and let me know what you think of it!

Here are a few notes to get the most out of this exercise:

  • Think REACH and PEEL. Reach long with the arms to open up the upper back, and then think about peeling the pelvis and hips off the ground. If you do this right you should feel your hammies engage immediately.
  • Hold in a position where you have abs. This part is really important – pull yourself up as high as you can while still keeping your pelvis underneath you (i.e. your abs on). The second you start to drive with your back, you’re not getting what you want to out of the exercise.
  • OWN the top position. In that top position, think about keeping the hammies engaged, and when you exhale, try to reach and tuck the pelvis even more.

Whether it’s the standard variation or going one leg at a time, this is a powerful exercise to have in the toolbox. Enjoy!

All the best,
MR

The post Learn to Control Anterior Pelvic Tilt with THIS Exercise appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Long-Term Athletic Development Applications to Speed Training

Mon, 05/13/2019 - 05:00

Note from MR: The following is a guest article from Boston Bruins strength coach Kevin Neeld. If you enjoy this article, I’d highly suggest picking up a copy of his new released Speed Training for Hockey book as well.

Enjoy!

Anyone that has been around sports for a long time has seen both of these seemingly conflicting scenarios…

  • An athlete that seems “elite” at young ages gets passed by the crowd in high school or college
  • An athlete that seems behind at young ages outperforms early expectations to reach an elite status at older ages

In an effort to better understand the developmental processes that lead to these types of “failures” and “successes”, researchers and applied practitioners have developed several different Long-Term Athletic Development (LTAD) models.

As an early disclaimer, I put failures and successes in quotes above because there is A LOT more value in sport than just reaching a level where you get paid to play. In fact, I would argue that the overemphasis on being “elite” in youth sports is one of the most profoundly negative trends in all of child development.

LTAD models serve two primary purposes:

  1. Part of ensuring that coaches, parents, and training professionals are sending the right messages to youth athletes at the right time lies in understanding the development process.
  2. Understanding the development process may help training professionals and sport coaches emphasize specific qualities at specific times to help maximize an athlete’s development at a given age to help them peak at the right

The below image offers an inclusive look at many notable LTAD principles (image from Ford et al., 2011).

Model of Long-Term Athletic Development from Ford et al., 2011

Within it, there are a few important concepts that are worth pointing out:

  1. Different stages of development are associated with the accelerated improvement in specific physical qualities (e.g. speed, aerobic development, strength, etc.)
  2. The most appropriate emphasis on structured training changes throughout development based on physical, mental, and emotional growth
  3. There are significant differences in the age at which these changes/milestones occur from individual to individual, so everything above should be interpreted on an individual basis.

To simplify the first point above, below are the ages at which accelerated development occurs for specific physical qualities:

These periods are based on specific changes that occur naturally throughout development.

At first glance, it seems pretty simple.

Run more sprints in the speed windows, do more aerobic work in the aerobic window, etc.

But there’s some missing information that is really important.

Namely, WHY do these qualities progress faster at these ages?

One of the biggest misuses of LTAD models is doing exactly what I suggested above – taking the windows of accelerated adaptation at face value, and just drilling more work for those qualities.

Here’s the thing – the accelerated development occurs naturally. There isn’t really any evidence to suggest that doing MORE of that type of work will actually lead to larger improvements.

However, understanding the underlying mechanisms causing these rapid improvements will help shed some light on which training qualities the athlete IS primed to adapt to.

Most of these adaptations can be explained by looking at the development of three (really four) systems:

  • Neurological
  • Skeletal
  • Muscular/Hormonal
Neurological

You’ve probably heard at some point that it’s easier for kids to learn new languages at really young ages than it is for an adult. This is because young kids are going through rapid neurological growth that makes it easier for them to learn new information, including movement skills.

This natural neurological growth is the driver behind the first speed window and augmented movement skill development. These things really go hand in hand – as the brain learns better movement strategies, it’s able to coordinate specific patterns faster.

Skeletal

If you look back at the LTAD graph above, you’ll see PHV at the bottom. This stands for “Peak Height Velocity”, which basically means the fastest part of the growth spurt.

This rapid growth changes limb lengths, muscle architecture/insertions, and cardiac development. This ultimately leads to improvements in aerobic fitness and the second speed window.

Regarding speed, these improvements are largely the result of structural changes – that is, longer levers cover more distance. Unfortunately, as you’ve likely seen, rapid growth spurts also come with considerable coordination challenges, at least at first. In other words, the athlete may get from point A to point B faster, but it’s not always pretty.

Muscular/Hormonal

Lastly, at some point in the development process kids experience a significant change in their hormonal environment. This change makes it easier to develop muscle mass, and as a result, strength.

To be fair, things aren’t this simple. There is a lot of overlap between when these changes occur, and development is much more complex than what I’ve outlined above. However, the primary driving factors for the outlined changes can still be useful for guiding training decisions for athletes at different ages.

Training Applications

While this information is interesting, putting it into practice to enhance the athlete’s training experience and deliver better outcomes is really where the rubber meets the road. Here are 3 ways to integrate this information into your training programs:

#1 – With kids younger than 12, focus on the 3 E’s: Exposure, Engagement, and Enjoyment.

The rapid brain development makes kids this age sponges for new movement information, so integrate new movements, activities, challenges, and coaching cues.

From a psychosocial standpoint, overly structured programs can be extremely harmful to the long-term integration of training for these kids.

Keep things  interactive and fun. Fun for them; fun for the coach.

Think gym class games like:

  • Obstacle courses,
  • Tag,
  • Relay races,
  • Playing catch,
  • Etc.

All of these activities can  use varied constraints to help keep it fun, but also challenge different movement strategies.

For example, relay races could be performed using a variety of movement patterns (e.g. split the distance or reps between shuffling, single-leg hopping, bear crawling, and running).

#2 – During periods of rapid growth (typically starting around age 12), slow things down to speed things up.

This is a turbulent time for kids.

I liken it to waking up one morning and having to go through your day wearing shoes with a 6” block underneath.

Everything about the athlete’s movement needs to be reorganized based on a rapidly changing environment and feedback from joints/muscles.

This period coincides with the stage where it’s appropriate to introduce more structured training. Teach basic movement patterns (e.g. squat, lunge, hip hinge, push, pull, etc.) using isometrics or long eccentrics to help the athlete better feel and internalize optimal positioning and controlled movement.

Speed increases naturally because of the structural changes referenced above, but improving strength, end-range control and overall coordination will help facilitate larger improvements.

#3 – When height changes start to stabilize (i.e. slower changes, starting around age 16), start to ramp up training intensity.

It may seem logical to take advantage of hormonal changes to put on muscle mass, and for many athletes, this may be appropriate.

However, remember that these hormonal changes are naturally occurring. Athletes are likely to put on some muscle mass anyway, with or without hypertrophy-focused training, and as many team sports have shifted toward prioritizing elite speed (and skill), maximizing weight gain shouldn’t be the goal.

This is the perfect time, though, to start to ramp up intensity with sprinting, more  advanced plyometrics, and heavier resistance training.

Because the overall output in these exercises will be higher, there should also be longer rest periods between sprint repeats, and sets of power and strength exercises.

In general, the focus should be on quality, maximal effort reps, with enough rest to minimize  drop-off.

Wrap Up

Understanding the development process can help athletes maximize the improvement of specific qualities during periods of time when their bodies are primed to adapt. Speed development isn’t as simple as just running sprints, so having an appreciation for why physical qualities adapt an accelerated rate will help coaches understand which qualities to prioritize during different stages to support maximal training progress.

References:

Ford, P., De Ste Croix, M., Lloyd, R., Meyers, R., Moosavi, M., Oliver, J., Till, K., & Williams, C. (2011). The Long-Term Athlete Development model: Physiological evidence and application. Journal of Sports Sciences, 29(4), 389-402.

About the Author

Kevin Neeld is the Head Performance Coach for the Boston Bruins, where he oversees all aspects of designing and implementing the team’s performance training program, as well as monitoring the players’ performance, workload, and recovery.

Prior to Boston, Kevin spent two years as an Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach for the San Jose Sharks, after serving as the director of a private sports performance facility in New Jersey for seven years. Kevin also worked as a strength and conditioning coach with the U.S. Women’s Olympic Ice Hockey Team for five years.

Kevin is currently a PhD candidate in Rocky Mountain University’s Human and Sport Performance program. An accomplished author, Kevin recently released his new book Speed Training for Hockey.

Speed Training for Hockey is a 150-page book that dissects all aspects of speed development for ice hockey players, written in language that can be easily understood by hockey coaches, players, and parents. It includes three 12-week training programs for players in the U-14, 14-18, and 18+ age groups, and a video database of all the exercises included in the programs.

The post Long-Term Athletic Development Applications to Speed Training appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Adam Loiacono on Coaching and Culture Across Professional Sport

Fri, 05/10/2019 - 05:00

Adam Loiacono, PT, DPT, CSCS is a physical therapist and performance coach with 10 years’ experience in sport. Adam has worked with various populations including men, women, and youth athletes. His experiences thus far have included opportunities in the NBA, MLS, and NWSL in various roles including rehabilitation, performance coaching, sport science, and a sport coach.

While Adam was a previous guest way back in episode 54, he’s had some really cool experiences since then, and I knew it was time to get him back on.

In this show, Adam and I talk about working in both the NBA and MLS, the differences he sees between the two leagues, and why there are more similarities than differences when it comes to developing athletes in youth and pro sports.

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of what we covered in this week’s show:

  • Show Intro:
  • Interview with Adam:
    • Adam’s background, and what he’s been up to lately.
    • What’s new in his world, including his recent time in the NBA.
    • His experience in the NBA, what his day-to-day responsibilities looked like, and how it was different that previous positions.
    • Adam’s thoughts on cultural differences he’s noticed between soccer and basketball.
    • The logistical differences he’s seen between the NBA and MLS, and how that impacts both work and day-to-day life.
    • His thoughts on the differences (as well as the numerous similarities) between professional and youth sports.
    • THE ONE piece of advice he’d give to a new coach or therapist to get them started on the right foot.
    • A really fun lightning round where we talk about Hawaii, the books he’s reading, the athlete that has stood out the most to him, and what’s next for Adam Loiacono (hint – he’s a free agent!)
Related Links

Connect with Adam

Books

 

The Best Protein on the Market Today?

For many years, I simply disregarded the age-old advice of getting liquid protein in either during or after workouts.

Part of this was due to the fact that most had so much crap in them I didn’t want to put them in my body, and others might have been high-quality but tasted absolutely disgusting.

However, if you’re looking for a protein that’s not only high-quality but also tastes amazing, you need to check out Momentous.

I’ve been using Momentous for several months now, and I can tell you it’s hands-down the best tasting protein I’ve ever had. But it’s not just me – I have numerous elite athletes who are very picky with their protein powders, and every one of them raves about how great Momentous protein shakes taste.

And while the taste is amazing, the best part about Momentous is that they’re incredibly transparent with what goes into their product. You never have to worry about a tainted or dirty supplement, as all of their products are NSF and Informed Sport certified.

If you’d like to try Momentous out for yourself, here’s how to do it:

  1. Head over to LiveMomentous.com/Robertson
  2. If you want to try a sample, use the code RobertsonSample
  3. When you’re order to order, use the code Robertson20 to save 20% off your first order!

Regardless of which option you choose, I guarantee once you try Momentous protein shakes, you’ll never go back to anything else!

 

Please Leave a Review!

As I mentioned in the show, we just hit 100 5-star reviews of the Physical Preparation Podcast. Thank you!

If my show has created value for you (either now or in the past), please take 30-seconds out of your day and head over to iTunes and please give the show a 5-star review. Our next goal is to hit 250 5-Star reviews.

Thanks so much for your support!

The post Adam Loiacono on Coaching and Culture Across Professional Sport appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Coaching and Cuing the Glute Bridge

Wed, 05/08/2019 - 05:00

 

One of my favorite books as a young coach was Muscles: Testing and Function by Florence Kendall.

It’s the book that really got me thinking about posture, alignment, and movement quality – not just moving maximal weights.

When assessing the glutes, one of the tests I used for years was a prone hip extension test: Have a client/athlete lie face down on a table, bend their knee to 90 degrees, and have them lift their thigh to see what muscles turn on first.

After performing this test a couple hundred times, I kept seeing people use their back extensors first – NOT their hip extensors.

As such, the glute bridge became one of my go-to exercises to cure this “glute amnesia” (as we liked to call it back in the day).

And while I still use the glute bridge in my programs, the way I coach and cue it today is vastly different than I did way back in 2003.

In this short video, I show you the exact set-up and cues I use nowadays to get someone doing the glute bridge and actually feeling their glutes!

Once you watch the video, here are a few things to make sure you’re coaching and cuing:

  • Cue the exhale to set position. Make sure the ribs are down and the back is flat before starting the movement.
  • Keep the abs engaged. It’s imperative that the abs are on to help control the lower back and pelvis. I like to remind my clients and athletes to “keep the belt buckle up.”
  • Make sure to use your glutes! I always tell people I don’t care about range of motion initially – just make sure you’re keeping the abs engaged and working on hip (versus back) extension.

The glute bridge is an awesome exercise, and coaching/cuing it in this fashion will really take it to the next level.

Enjoy!

All the best,
MR

The post Coaching and Cuing the Glute Bridge appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Donnie Maib on Growing and Evolving as a Coach

Fri, 05/03/2019 - 07:56

Donnie Maib has been the Head Coach for Athletic Performance for Olympic Sports since 2011. Maib oversees all aspects of athletic performance efforts for all sports at the University of Texas with the exception of Men’s/Women’s Basketball and Football.

I first met Donnie at one of the PLAE summits a few years back, and he was someone I truly enjoyed learning from – not just because of his thoughts on coaching, but on his thoughts with regards to life and perspective as well.

In this show, Donnie and I talk about how a freak injury ended his football career but gave him his start in the world of physical preparation, how he’s evolved over 20+ years from a programming and coaching perspective, and how he’s been lucky enough to win not one but two national championships in his time at Texas.

Donnie is one of those guys that’s just a wealth of experience, and I know you’re going to love this show.

 

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of what we covered in this week’s show:

  • Show Intro
  • Interview with Donnie
    • How a tragic injury got Donnie started in the world of physical preparation.
    • How is injury affected and impacted him as a coach.
    • Donnie’s coaching philosophy 25 years ago when he started as a football strength and conditioning coach.
    • How his philosophy has evolved working with men’s tennis and women’s volleyball players.
    • If he were to take over a new position, what he would do differently to get it started on the right path.
    • His first gig in the speaking world, and why an epic failure lead to success down the line.
    • The BIG Question.
    • A fun lightning round where we talk about his career highlight(s), the most impactful book he’s read in the past year, his favorite city to travel to, and what’s next for Donnie Maib.

 

Related Links

Connect with Donnie

 Books Referenced

 

The Best Protein on the Market Today?

For many years, I simply disregarded the age-old advice of getting liquid protein in either during or after workouts.

Part of this was due to the fact that most had so much crap in them I didn’t want to put them in my body, and others might have been high-quality but tasted absolutely disgusting.

However, if you’re looking for a protein that’s not only high-quality but also tastes amazing, you need to check out Momentous.

I’ve been using Momentous for several months now, and I can tell you it’s hands-down the best tasting protein I’ve ever had. But it’s not just me – I have numerous elite athletes who are very picky with their protein powders, and every one of them raves about how great Momentous protein shakes taste.

And while the taste is amazing, the best part about Momentous is that they’re incredibly transparent with what goes into their product. You never have to worry about a tainted or dirty supplement, as all of their products are NSF and Informed Sport certified.

If you’d like to try Momentous out for yourself, here’s how to do it:

  1. Head over to LiveMomentous.com/Robertson
  2. If you want to try a sample, use the code RobertsonSample
  3. When you’re order to order, use the code Robertson20 to save 20% off your first order!

Regardless of which option you choose, I guarantee once you try Momentous protein shakes, you’ll never go back to anything else!

 

Please Leave a Review!

As I mentioned in the show, I’d really love to get to 100 5-star reviews of the Physical Preparation Podcast.

If my show has created value for you (either now or in the past), please take 30-seconds out of your day and head over to iTunes and please give the show a 5-star review.

I’d appreciate it more than you know!

The post Donnie Maib on Growing and Evolving as a Coach appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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How to Single-Leg RDL

Wed, 05/01/2019 - 05:00

The single-leg Romanian deadlift (RDL) falls into the camp of “awesome exercises that are also really hard to do.”

Many people assume that because a single-leg RDL uses less load than a trap bar, conventional or traditional RDL that it’s somehow an “easier” exercise.

That, my friend, would be a false assumption.

In fact, single-leg RDL’s are an incredibly challenging exercise for at least two reasons:

  1. With only one foot on the ground, you’re really challenging tri-planar stability of the foot, ankle, knee and hip, and
  2. You’re loading the hinge pattern (which in and of itself can be tough) in a unilateral fashion.

But just because it’s challenging doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be doing it – or at least working towards it.

If you (or your clients and athletes) don’t have the stability and control just yet, be sure to watch my previous video on how to kickstand RDL. It’s the perfect regression as it trains the same pattern, but with both feet on the ground.

But once you’re ready to rock, this quick tutorial should give you the major points to focus on when performing the single-leg RDL!

Now that you’ve watched the video, here are a few key areas to focus on when you’re performing, coaching, or cuing the lift:

  • Start with a soft knee! Make sure you can feel the whole foot at the start, balancing the weight between the toes and heels.
  • Keep the back flat. Unlocking the knee will stack the ribcage on top of the pelvis, and then simply work through whatever your current range of motion is – don’t force it.
  • The pelvis should stay square. In a true single-leg exercise, it’s very hard to control hip and pelvic alignment. Work on keeping the hips and pelvis square towards the front throughout. If a client/athlete is struggling here, you may need to physically put your hands on their hips to give them an idea of what “square” really is!
  • Feel the whole foot throughout. Just like keeping the hips square can be difficult, it may be tough to feel the whole foot as you lower down. Don’t just think about feeling the toes/heels, but the inside/outside of the foot as well.

The single-leg RDL is a challenging exercise, but one that’s definitely worth mastering as well.

I hope these simple tips make your performance, coaching, and cuing of this lift a little bit better!

All the best,
MR

The post How to Single-Leg RDL appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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A Perspective on Program Analysis and Design: Explore your Belief System

Mon, 04/29/2019 - 05:00

You’re sitting down to write out the new phase of your team’s training program…

  • What is your process?
  • What are the underlying training principles you reflect on to create the sheet your athletes will use?
  • Where do these principles come from?

When you are determining what your athletes and their sport require, you are tapping into your belief system about what training is.

Every thing that you put in your program is based on underlying training principles that you believe in.

There is (or should be) a reason these things are in your program, as you are designating them as important once you choose to write them on the sheet. The things I am referring to can be exercises, reps, sets, exercise order, testing numbers, and words. You then carry out these things with explanations, cues and your behavior as a coach.

These things all come from your perception of what training is, in relation to exercise selection, how an exercise should be performed, what a strength and conditioning coach should be, and what the athlete is expected to do. It is the lens through which you view training.

All the things on this program are based on underlying training principles within my belief system Belief Systems

A belief system is a set of principles or tenets which together form the basis of a religion, philosophy, or moral code.

In the context of this article, your strength and conditioning coaching belief system is formulated by your principles of sport training and exercise. These interconnected set of principles organize and create inherent qualities of mind and character in relation to behavior (as a coach).

Another definition for a belief system is a cognitive framework that helps to predict potential outcomes, thus assisting to better regulate our emotional disposition to an anomaly. Therefore, your training belief system includes what you interpret as important in the weight room, the interventions you create for a desired outcome in training, and your emotional and behavioral response to training/a trainer that may be different from your own style.

What you view as important in the weight room are your underlying principles as a coach. You use these principles for your program analysis, design, and coaching.

How you feel towards something that deviates from what is normal, standard, or expected and how you respond to it, taps into your system of beliefs and underlying personality structure.

Any time you get into thoughts about, is this good or bad and how you respond to what is good or bad, you are tapping into your belief systems.

  • Is this good or bad exercise selection?
  • Is this good or bad exercise technique?
  • Is this good or bad program design?

Your beliefs about what is good or bad can be molded through personal experiences and can also be provided to you. Your own training experience, your previous strength and conditioning coaches, your mentors (people in positions of influence), internships, and reading material of choice can formulate your perception of what training is and is not. Your beliefs can also be provided to you by academic institutions, modality systems, or social systems.

There are pros and cons to belief systems. The pros are that they create a cohesive narrative, assist in decision making, and allow you to have opinions about what is good vs bad.

The cons are that they can blind you and bias you in our decision making.

The pros and cons can be elaborated within a spectrum of rigidity and permeability within our belief systems. If we are too rigid, we view our opinions as facts then protect and justify these beliefs possibly creating conflict and restricting personal growth.

If we are too permeable then nothing matters, we have no values, and can be swayed in our opinions with every new thing we are told. If you are too permeable or have no belief system at all, when you experience an anomaly you don’t have a mode of being, in which you will experience anxiety.

There is utility in belief systems and anxiety. A belief system provides you with a way to behave when you experience an anomaly and having a belief system that resonates with you facilitates purpose and meaning. Experiencing anxiety in relation to your belief systems will allow you to transform and become better, it is what you are supposed to face.

Your decision making process in creating a training program is a reflection of your beliefs about training. The training program and how it is implemented becomes your athletes’ belief system towards training. The environment you create for the people on the team provides a structure for how you want them to regulate themselves. There are three elements we will explore based on our training belief systems:

  1. Program analysis is your belief system towards training
  2. Program design is the belief system you provide to athletes
  3. Program Team Dynamics/Environment is the culture you create within a team setting
Program Analysis:
My Belief System Towards Training

When I examine the elements or structure of a training program I am going to design, I think about three areas: specificity vs variation, questioning is I am starting with an exercise or starting with an intent, and creating a learning environment.

1. Specificity vs Variation

In relation to specificity and performance based activity, I place my training values less with having a reductionist approach of breaking down biomechanics and energy systems to attempt to mimic, and more towards skill acquisition and motor learning strategies.

Skill acquisition is what I think an athlete should do well vs. what I don’t care about in the weight room.

Within the weight room setting, what do I think athletes need to be able to do?

Once I choose what skills I think they should acquire, what methods and tactics am I going to select in order to teach those skills?

I want athletes to perform these skills at a high level which is going to be less variable and more predictable. I then have to question my biases. I can’t fool myself into thinking that the weight room is the only thing that matters in relation to athletic performance and that the activities I select have direct transfer to sport.

Including specificity into my program design will also include deciding what I want the athletes to BELIEVE is important; these will be my training principles and values.

In relation to variation, I place my training values on exposing athletes to various positions and movements that they don’t usually experience. I believe that including variation is a major health component of training. Variation will assist in dispersing load to different tissues and create long term sustainable training strategies.

Overall, I BELIEVE that both are important; I place value on both skill acquisition and progressive overload (specificity) and exposure to different positions and novelty (variation) within the weight room.

2. Starting with the exercise or start with the intent?

Here is where I take time to question my own training beliefs.

Am I starting with an exercise, or the intent of the exercise?

For example, when I am filling out my programming template A1, A2, A3, am I thinking about where I am going to fill in the squat, bench press, clean, and deadlift exercise or am I starting with an intent?

If my intent is to teach athletes how to absorb force and create force against gravity with sagittal plane competency, then the squat exercise as a good method for that intent. If I write ‘squat’ on my program sheet, as a thing, I want there to be a rationale coinciding with a principle and value.

Am I associating an exercise with a specific quality?

For example, am I selecting the back squat exercise because I associate that with the quality of strength? That association may be placed within a biased belief system of what I believe strength is and why it is important for an athlete to develop for improved on-field performance.

This questioning allows me not to be married to a specific exercise and allows me to explore my creativity.

The intention also includes strategies: how do I want an athlete to perform and exercise and how do I want them to feel about it.

There is no absolute way to lift weights, there are just strategies.

For example, I can select the squat pattern for an exercise, however I can vary in where I place the load or the cues (focused attention) I used in relation to how I want them to think about how their hips and knees should move, or if they should have focus on an internal or external reference.

  • Are those strategies in the best interest of the athletes or are they the only ones that I know?
  • Are these strategies sustainable?
  • Do they provide long term learning opportunities or short term gains?
  • What’s my plan for progression of these strategies?
    • Progress by maintaining strategies under load
    • Increase the amount of strategies
    • Active vs Passive Strategies
3. Creating a learning environment

Lessons will provide the acquisition of knowledge or skills through experience, study, or by being taught.

So, what do I want to teach the athletes I work with?

I create lessons within training sessions in relation to the specific skills I want to teach athletes. I then reinforce these lessons that encompass my training principles with everything I do within that training session.

The lesson is initiated by discussing it with the team before the session to focus their attention towards it and reinforced after the session with questions and archetypes of execution observed from the athletes.

Program Design:
Facilitate Growth of My Belief System for Athletes

You may believe your program will lead to the desired outcome, but now you need to create a belief system for your athletes so they believe the same thing. You will need to consider how to make your beliefs about training, their beliefs.

This not only applies to their current training program, but also their overarching lens for how they perceive exercise. Perception can be a powerful mediator in the success of your program and their development of future exercise habits.

You must have things that are important to you and know that they will become important to your athletes. There is responsibility within this.

  • What do you want them to value?
  • How are you going to make your training beliefs resonate with your athletes?
  • How do you want them to use these principles when you are not with them or in their future exercise habits?

The overall goal is to provide them with a mode of being/ how you want them to behave when they experience an anomaly.

This can be both when they are training without you or after they graduate. You want the athlete to have an understanding of what was important to you and make it important to them.

How do I want athletes to think about training? The belief system you provide them will be how they think about exercise for the rest of their lives.

  • Do they only associate exercise with sport?
  • Did you teach them anything that they can maintain?
  • Did they LEARN how to train and take care of themselves?
  • Did they learn how to appreciate the process and the virtues of character that come with exercise?
  • Can they apply what they learned to establishing responsibility for their own health and fitness?
Putting it Together

When I am creating a program to lead athletes towards a desired outcome I have a three step process:

  1. I use my training principles to determine what I think is important and what lessons I want to teach the athletes.
  2. I create exercises to match my training principles and that reflect the intention of the desired outcome.
  3. I decide what strategies I want the athletes to execute the exercises with.A) This includes providing autonomy and options for strategies or choice of tool. Once a level of experience and understanding is attained, allowing the athlete to be involved in the process will create a sense of control and potentially elicit more effort. Success with process goals is strongly dependent upon effort. Their input and choice of tool can be a valuable aspect of proper execution of a pattern. Choice is also involved in the process of guided discovery which allows athletes to begin figuring it out things for themselves. Guided discovery can help create curiosity and meaningfulness in a belief system.B) I also manipulate by coaching tactics within this step. I may need to utilize an adaptive personality, make decisions on cueing, and provide different types of feedback based upon the athlete’s personality and temperament. How do I deliver information? What do I celebrate as important? For example, if I celebrate a maximal load lifted, then I am creating a belief in the athletes that maximal load lifted is valued. However, if I choose to celebrate a teammate positively encouraging another teammate or being thoughtful during an exercise, that establishes the behavior as valued.
The process of designing a training program:
Creating a learning environment through principles and lessons

I use my 4 training principles that I have written out to determine what I deem to be important. My training principles include:

  1. Proximal structure position influences movement of distal structures
  2. Expose the body to positions and shapes it struggles to achieve
  3. Athletic skill acquisition includes the ability to transition from leg to leg
    A) Centering (shifting) & Dissociation (rotating)
    B) Loading & Propelling
  4. Growth is experience in various types of hard work
    A) Physical, Awareness, Humility & Gratitude, and Perspective

I use these principles to create a learning environment. Each principle involves lessons that I want to teach the athletes.

A lesson will help regulate training sessions and move the athlete towards a way to behave. A lesson will guide my exercise selection choice and strategies for execution that will be reinforced throughout the session.

Lessons can also create excitement and meaningfulness.

“Principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own methods. The man who tries methods, ignoring principles, is sure to have trouble.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

An Example of this Process
  1. Choose the lesson of transitioning from leg to leg which is an important concept for all sporting activities such as running, skating, throwing a ball, and change of direction.
  2. Exercises that will match this intent involve lateral stance activities, push mechanic drills, and change of direction drills.
  3. Strategies for execution involve teaching and reiterating centering and dissociation concepts. Centering involves frontal plane mechanics and the ability to shift yourself over a leg. Dissociation involves rotating a thorax over a pelvis which is important for acceleration, change of direction, and shooting. I choose exercises relating to this lesson and sequence them together to reinforce the concepts (video for pairing exercises within this lesson).
The concept of centering that is used to create exercises and strategies for athletes to learn and execute

 

Sequencing the concept of centering within the program design. The exercises are ordered in a way to reinforce the lesson and add complexity  Program Team Environment

A key influence on the desired outcome of the program design is the interaction between coach and athlete, as well as athlete to athlete. The human experience needs to be facilitated for belief in the program, team, and meaningfulness in sport.

The purpose of sport and the reason for training can’t be assumed to be obvious. Make the purpose and ‘why’ clear. Plan the transfer of information and put forth effort to communicate this information.

My fourth training principle is growth and experience in various types of hard work; this is implemented in what I expect out of the athletes.

This is including a psycho-emotional variable into programming for team environments. A coaching staff has the ability to manage total loads inclusing as physical, cognitive, and emotional loading. You can reduce anxiety through creating positive relationships, team culture, teaching values such as self- compassion, gratitude, humility, and respect in order to improve overall team performance.

  • Do they enjoy coming to the training center every day?
  • Is the environment welcoming, supportive, and non-threatening?

Installing a belief system relates to both a cognitive framework towards physical exercise but also personal qualities of character. A team environment based on a structured value system will allow them to have a mode of being when responding to times of challenge. Can they behave with these values during times of losing?

The values and implementation of gratitude, respect, and humility can carry over to team success and personal growth. You have the ability to create a cognitive framework that sets them up to make decisions putting them on a positive trajectory. This is the usefulness of sport and being responsible from a positive of influence.

  • Do you only value winning? Do you only celebrate winning?
  • Do you discuss virtues of character and acknowledge them?
  • What are associating as important? Winning or qualities of character?
Conclusion: Discover Your Belief System

Discover your belief system by articulating what you already do. Write down your training principles and values. However, be willing to allow them to change.

Ask yourself the following questions:

  • What is important to you in training? What are your training principles?
  • What are they good for?
    • Creating a cohesive message and language with your athletes
    • Creating a framework to which athletes regulate themselves
  • What are they leaving you blind to?
    • Expose yourself to a different training belief systems and create your own filter
Optimal learning environment to change your belief system

The sweet spot to adapting your belief system (shaping how you feel and respond to anomalies) is to be curious and interested.

Too bored or too threatened can impact how your belief systems are adapted or reinforced.

Your ability to adapt and grow your beliefs relates to the amount of anomaly you are ready for.

It is our job as strength and conditioning coaches to determine what matters. Typical program design variables include exercise selection, frequency, exercise order, rest periods, volume, training loads, and repetitions.

However, belief systems supersede decision making. Program design is deciding what you should care about vs. what you should care less about. What you care about then becomes what your athletes care about and how they will view training and exercise.

To watch my full presentation about this topic at the Holy Cross Sport Performance Conference, CLICK HERE

About the Author

Michelle Boland

  • Director of Education at Pure Performance Training (Needham, MA)
  • Owner of Michelle Boland Training, LLC
  • Previous Strength and Conditioning Coach at Northeastern University (Boston, MA)
  • Exercise Physiology and M.S. Strength and Conditioning at Springfield College
  • S. Nutrition at Keene State College
  • Follow on Instagram @mboland18

References

  1. Cupples, Z. Human Matrix. 2018. https://zaccupples.com/
  2. Davidson, P. Rethinking the Big Patterns. 2017. drpatdavidson.com
  3. Glazier, P.S. (2017). Towards a Grand Unified Theory of sports performance. Human Movement, 56, 139-156.
  4. Hartman, B. The Intensive II. 2018. billhartman.net
  5. Kiely, J. (2018). Periodization Theory: Confronting an Inconvenient Truth. Sports Med, 48, 753-764.
  6. Rokeach, M. (2015). The Open and Closed Mind: Investigations into the nature of belief systems and personality systems. Williams & Wilkins; New York, NY.
  7. Rutjens, B. & Brandt, M. (2019). Belief Systems and the Perception of Reality (Currents Issues in Social Psychology). Routledge; New York, NY.
  8. Young, D. (2014). How to think about exercise. The school of life, Picador: New York, NY.
  9. List of Continuing Education Courses Attended. http://www.michelleboland-training.com/about-me/

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Tony Giuliano on Feedback, Internships and Becoming a Mentor

Fri, 04/26/2019 - 05:00

Tony Giuliano is the new Account Educator for EXOS at Google. Working under the Director for Talent Development, he is responsible for helping shape internal education for the account, introducing new hires to the EXOS methodology, and running the internship program.

Before finding his way to Google HQ, he was pulling double duty as the Office Manager and a Performance Coach at IFAST, with stops at Stanford University and Absolute Performance Training in Buffalo, NY along the way.

In this show, Tony and I talk about how he became known as the Bay Area’s Most Dangerous White Belt in BJJ, how he’s creating an environment where his coaches can success, tips on giving feedback, and how he’s gone about building an internship program from the ground up.

Tony is not only a great coach, but an even better human being, and someone I always enjoy chatting with.

 

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of what we covered in this week’s show:

  • Show Intro
  • Interview with Tony
    • How Tony got his start in the world of physical preparation.
    • The various career stops he’s had along the way (including his TWO stops at IFAST).
    • His overarching philosophy on working with and coaching people.
    • What a typical day looks like for Tony in his new position with Google/EXOS.
    • The logistical issues he deals with when working with tons of coaches across multiple training locations.
    • Feedback: How to give it and (perhaps more importantly) how to receive it.
    • Tony’s thought on building an internship program from the ground up.
    • What it’s like to go from being a mentee to becoming a mentor in the fitness industry.
    • The BIG Question.
    • A really fun lightning round where we talk comic books, regular books, the best part of living in the Bay Area, and what’s next for Tony Giuliano.

 

Related Links

Connect with Tony

Books and Links Referenced

 

The Best Protein on the Market Today?

For many years, I simply disregarded the age-old advice of getting liquid protein in either during or after workouts.

Part of this was due to the fact that most had so much crap in them I didn’t want to put them in my body, and others might have been high-quality but tasted absolutely disgusting.

However, if you’re looking for a protein that’s not only high-quality but also tastes amazing, you need to check out Momentous.

I’ve been using Momentous for several months now, and I can tell you it’s hands-down the best tasting protein I’ve ever had. But it’s not just me – I have numerous elite athletes who are very picky with their protein powders, and every one of them raves about how great Momentous protein shakes taste.

And while the taste is amazing, the best part about Momentous is that they’re incredibly transparent with what goes into their product. You never have to worry about a tainted or dirty supplement, as all of their products are NSF and Informed Sport certified.

If you’d like to try Momentous out for yourself, here’s how to do it:

  1. Head over to LiveMomentous.com/Robertson
  2. If you want to try a sample, use the code RobertsonSample
  3. When you’re order to order, use the code Robertson20 to save 20% off your first order!

Regardless of which option you choose, I guarantee once you try Momentous protein shakes, you’ll never go back to anything else!

 

Please Leave a Review!

As I mentioned in the show, I’d really love to get to 100 5-star reviews of the Physical Preparation Podcast.

If my show has created value for you (either now or in the past), please take 30-seconds out of your day and head over to iTunes and please give the show a 5-star review.

I’d appreciate it more than you know!

The post Tony Giuliano on Feedback, Internships and Becoming a Mentor appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

How to Kickstand RDL

Wed, 04/24/2019 - 05:00

I’m going to start today’s post by dropping a serious bit of truth on you:

Single-leg RDL’s are an awesome exercise – but they aren’t an easy exercise, and they’re definitely not suitable for beginners.

Much like the the forward lunge, you clients and athletes should have to earn the right to do this exercise.

If the traditional single-leg RDL is a little bit too advanced for now, you need to check out the kickstand RDL instead!

The kickstand RDL is awesome because:

  • It allows you to build strength in each leg independently of the other,
  • It teaches you to load the hips effectively, and
  • It doesn’t take a ton of weight to feel like you’re getting something out of the movement.

Here’s a quick demo of how to do it…

Now that you’ve watched the video, here are a few keys to getting the most out of this exercise:

  • Make sure the hips are squared to the front throughout. Often even if your client/athlete sets up correctly, they’ll have a tendency to spin and rotate once they start. Don’t let this happen!
  • Stay up on the back toes. Coming up on the back toes “pushes” you on the front leg, allowing you to load it better. Make sure they come up on the toes at the start, and stay on them throughout the course of the exercise.
  • Push the hips BACK. Just like in a traditional or single-leg RDL, make sure they’re pushing and load the hips, versus simply bending the knees.
  • Feel the whole foot and push. Again, just like a traditional RDL cue them to feel the whole foot while keeping the back flat, and when they run out of room, to simply PUSH to come back up to the starting position.

The kickstand RDL is an awesome way to build the single-leg RDL pattern, while giving you some extra stability and support.

If you’ve never tried this exercise before, give it a shot next time you’re in the gym. I think you’re going to love it!

All the best,
MR

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5 Reasons Your Workouts Aren’t Working

Mon, 04/22/2019 - 05:00

If you train long enough, chances are there will come a point in time where your training isn’t going well.

And while there are a lot of things that may be more important in life than our workouts, at the same time, it really sucks when it feels like you’re spinning your wheels in the gym!

In this article, I want to give you five of the biggest issues I see when a client or athlete of mine isn’t having success.

Now if you’re a trainer or coach and you’re crushing it in the gym, maybe this doesn’t apply to you – and that’s cool.

Bookmark it and save it for another day.

But chances are whether it’s you or someone you train, this article can benefit someone you know – right now, today.

So let’s jump in and talk about five reasons your workouts aren’t working!

#1 – You Don’t HAVE a Workout

Let’s start with one of the simplest reasons you aren’t seeing the results you want in the gym:

You don’t have a workout.

Or to be more clear, you don’t have a program.

There’s a lot more to seeing success in the gym than just showing up (although that is key – but more on that in a minute).

You need to have a focused plan of attack, a goal, for each and every training session you go through.

Maybe it’s using exercises to help you shed body fat.

Maybe it’s increasing your strength on the squat.

Or maybe it’s improving your speed and agility.

The fact of the matter is it doesn’t matter what you’re training for, but it needs to be clear that you’re training for something in particular!

Once you’ve decided what you’re training for, the next step is to find a progressive way to build on that same theme going forward.

Maybe it’s lifting heavier weights.

Maybe it’s decreasing the rest between sets.

Maybe it’s layering in more complex moves or advanced techniques.

Make it a goal to have a focused plan of attack not just for the session at hand, but where you want to go in the weeks and months to come.

It’s a blend of art and science, but as the saying goes, “Failing to plan is planning to fail.”

#2 – You’re Not Consistent

As much as I love giving my podcast away to you, selfishly, I learn a ton from them as well.

In a recent episode with Steve Calarco, he talked about an acronym he often uses with his clients and athletes – ACE.

  • A – Accountability
  • C – Consistency
  • E – Effort

While there’s a little bit more to it than just showing up and “putting in the work,” a big part of long-term success is simply showing up and putting in the work!

Consistency and work ethic are two of the great equalizers in the world.

There will always be people who are smarter, better looking, or have better hair (as evidenced by Jim Ferris and Mark Fisher).

But consistency and work ethic are two things you can control each and every time you step into the gym.

If consistency is a struggle, one of my favorite methods to generate accountability is to use the “Chain Link” effect. Jerry Seinfeld is someone that used this method to get him in the habit of writing jokes every day, but you can use it for any habit or goal you want to achieve.

Let’s say your goal is to workout at the gym every Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

Now using either a regular old-school calendar or one of those big “Year at a Glance” you put on the wall, start putting a big fat “X” on any day you take action.

The goal is to make a chain link either vertically (in the case of a goal that repeats on certain days), or horizontally (for a goal that repeats daily).

And while I’ve used this habit myself to give myself a visual reminder to stay on task, we also use it at at IFAST to keep our Instagram account lit.

(If you like this method, be sure to check out James Clear’s book Atomic Habits for more great info on building better habits.)

#3 – You Keep Changing the Goal

Dan John is one of my favorite authors of all-time for many reasons.

First, he’s a strong mofo who has always walked the walk.

Second, he’s one of the best story tellers I’ve ever seen or heard.

And last but not least, he does an amazing job of keeping things simple and to the point.

So with all that being said, here’s one of my favorite Dan John quotes:

“The goal is to keep the goal, the goal.”

How many times have you been guilty of program jumping?

It’s okay to raise your hand – I’ve been guilty of it myself.

One month I want to improve my movement quality.

The next month, I’m tired of the extra 5-10 pounds I’m carrying around, so it’s time to lean out.

And the month after that, I’m tired of being soft and weak – it’s time to get in the gym and get STRONG like bull!

Do you see where I’m going with this?

It’s impossible to see any sort of measurable growth if you’re constantly changing the metric by which you measure growth.

Stop and read that last sentence one more time – and then stop moving the goal posts.

Coming back to another podcast, Ryan Patrick talks about the concept of using 90-day sprints with his clients and athletes.

They sit down on Day 1 and hash out a specific and measurable goal the client wants to achieve.

They formulate a plan.

And for the next three months, they dial in their focus, crank up the intensity, and get to work!

If you’re not seeing the success you want, ask yourself if you’re constantly jumping from goal to goal.

And if so, find one thing you can focus on for the next 90 days, and then commit to it with everything you’ve got.

Chances are you’ll not only achieve that goal, but be even more motivated to continue this trend going forward.

#4 – You NEVER Change the Program

Let’s be honest: Change is hard.

From 2000-2005, I competed in competitive powerlifting, averaging two meets per year.

And from 2002-2005, I had a very set lifting schedule – it looked something like this:

  • Tuesday – Squat Day
  • Thursday – Bench Day
  • Friday/Saturday – Deadlift Day
  • Sunday – Accessory Bench Day

Even after I stopped powerlifting, that was still my routine for at least the next 5 years.

And that in and of itself isn’t the problem – having a routine is definitely a good thing.

My issue was that there was so little variety in my programming it eventually started to beat me up.

I’m a big believer that one of the best things you can do for your body is find ways to constantly change your exercises.

While the big rocks can always stay (i.e. squat day is still squat day), find different ways to get that same stimulus.

Front squat for a couple of months.

Swap in a safety bar a couple of times per year.

If the low back is feeling beat up, go with a belt squat instead.

Like Dan John said, the goal is to keep the goal the goal – so if you want to build a big squat, that’s awesome!

But if you haven’t rotate your exercise selection since George W. was in office, it may be time to freshen things up a bit!

#5 – You Can’t Stay Healthy

This final point goes along well with my previous one.

Many of the people that I coach both online and offline have struggled with injuries at some point in their career.

Sometimes it’s a freak accident.

Sometimes it’s an alignment or positional issue that’s driving things.

And sometimes, it’s just poor training and coaching that they’ve received in the past!

One of my biggest selling points to my clients and athletes is that my programs will get you to where you want to go in the safest and most effective way I know how.

Could I get faster gains if I threw caution to the wind?

Hells to the yeah!

But I also know that nothing slows your roll in the gym (or in life) worse than getting injured.

This is something I feel truly separates the pros from the wannabes in our field.

Don’t take this the wrong way, but getting stronger, building muscle, or shedding body fat in the short-term is easy.

The real question becomes, can you do this for an extended period of time without someone getting injured?

I’m a big believer that the biggest, fastest and strongest humans achieved these feats by training consistently for an extended period of time with little (or no interruption).

So if you want to get the most out of your training sessions going forward, dedicate yourself to getting healthy once and for all.

Your body will thank you!

Summary

So there you have it – 5 reasons your workouts aren’t working.

What else would you add?

Or is there anything specific I can do to help you get back on track?

If so, leave me a note in the “Comments” section below. I ‘d love to hear from you!

All the best,
MR

BTW – Having a qualified coach is one of the surest ways to help you get (and stay) on track.

If you’d like to work together, just head up to the top right corner and fill out the “Work with Mike” form. I’d love to learn more about you, and see if we’d be a good fit for each other!

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Categories: Feeds

Andreas Saltas on Training, Rehab, and Becoming the Bodmechanic

Fri, 04/19/2019 - 05:00

Andreas Saltas is a licensed Physical Therapist practicing in the state of New York. He attained his Bachelors Degree in 2009 studying physiotherapy at the Institute of Lamia in Greece.

Andreas achieved his dream of working with both professional bodybuilders and powerlifters once he moved back to the states. But in addition to that, he has now also broken into the NFL, working with players from the NY Giants and Buffalo Bills.

Andreas is a guy who I enjoy learning from, as he’s a creative thinker and definitely not afraid to think outside the box when it comes to training and therapy.

In this show, Andreas and I talk about how a massive motorcycle wreck and his comeback from it was the driving force behind him becoming a physical therapist, his holistic approach to assessing and treating his patients, and the differences he sees between powerlifters, bodybuilders, and football players, and how he treats them differently as a result.

 

Show Outline

Here’s an overview of what we covered in this week’s episode:

  • Show Intro
  • Interview with Andreas
    • How Andreas got interested in physical therapy, and why a horrific motorcycle accident changed and shaped his life forever.
    • His overarching approach and philosophy when it comes to treating his patients.
    • How Andreas goes about progressing and evolving the programs he gives his clients and athletes.
    • The major issues he sees when treating his powerlifters and bodybuilders, and why bodybuilders are actually the harder patients to treat!
    • His evolution into treating NFL players, how they’re different from “lifters,” and why he enjoys treating them so much.
    • What a typical day looks like for Andreas.
    • The BIG Question.
    • A really fun lightning round where we talk about work and life in NYC, the books he’s reading right now, some tips and tricks on social media, and the real deal story on how he became “The Bodmechanic.”

 

Related Links

Connect with Andreas

Books Mentioned

 

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients?

Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks by using a specific deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

 

Help Me Get to 100!

As I mentioned in the show, I’d really love to get to 100 5-star reviews of the Physical Preparation Podcast.

If my show has created value for you (either now or in the past), please take 30-seconds out of your day and head over to iTunes and please give the show a 5-star review.

I’d appreciate it more than you know!

The post Andreas Saltas on Training, Rehab, and Becoming the Bodmechanic appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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How to Lunge Without Crushing Your Knees

Wed, 04/17/2019 - 05:00

Lunges are one of my all-time favorite leg exercises.

Once I got through over the “my legs are already big enough phase” and started training seriously, squats, deadlifts and lunge variations were always staples in my training routines.

Now for some reason, many people assume that just because lunges are a common exercise that they’re somehow “easy” to perform.

But not so fast my friend!

Lunges (and especially forward lunges) are a great exercise, but they definitely aren’t for beginners. When done incorrectly they can put a ton of stress on the hips, lower back, and especially the knees.

If you have clients or athletes who struggle to lunge correctly, here’s how I coach and cue this exercise, as well as some technique issues you need to watch out for.

Now that you’ve watched the video, here are some bullet points to help drive home the big points:

  • Forward lunges are a challenging exercise because your client or athletes is forced to land, stabilize, decelerate, and then power up and back to the starting position. It may look simple, but this is a lot to unpack for many clients and athletes.
  • If a standard forward lunge is too difficult, have your client/athlete start with either a reverse lunge, a split-squat, or even in half-kneeling initially.
  • When they step forward, make sure they can feel the whole foot upon landing, and especially the heel. Many will have a tendency to drift forward onto the toes, which puts undue stress on the knees.
  • When they step back out of the lunge, make sure to keep the core in the appropriate position. Many will have a tendency to anteriorly tilt and extend the back to help power them out of the bottom.
  • Last but not least, make sure they maintain good foot-knee-hip alignment throughout. This is critical both when loading the front leg, and when propelling back to the top position.

Lunges are an all-round amazing exercise for building stability, control, and strength, but make sure you’re coaching them up if you want to get the most out of them.

I sincerely hope this video helps you with your clients and athletes. Have a great day!

All the best,
MR

The post How to Lunge Without Crushing Your Knees appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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5 Simple Hacks You Can Use in the Gym TODAY

Mon, 04/15/2019 - 05:00

One of the biggest issues I see when people train is missing (or poorly executing) lifts due to a poor set-up.

Now this is might be obvious when it comes to big-bang lifts like squats and deadlifts.

Let’s take the squat for example: If you’re doing a back squat and your weight is pushed forward and on your toes, you’re not magically going to correct that and find your heels.

Instead, you have to fix the set-up and get the feet more balanced from the start to fix the actual lift itself.

But while this concept applies to our big lifts, I think we need to remember how important a good set-up is in all of our accessory and supplemental lifts as well.

So without any further ado, here are five ninja tricks that I think will make a big difference in your coaching.

#1 -Improve the Set-up in Half-Kneeling

One of the biggest issues I see when my clients and athletes are doing half-kneeling variations is putting their knee too far back on the pad.

In my mental model, I want the set-up to be relatively close to a 90-90 position between the front and back knee/hip, but I want them to feel the whole front foot as well.

So here’s the thing – if they set-up with the knee too far back on the pad, their front foot gets too far out in front of the body, and now they lose toe contact.

To remedy this, make sure that your clients/athletes always set-up with their knee in the middle of the pad, or slightly towards the front.

This will ensure that you can get them into a perfect 90-90 position, with whole foot contact, each and every time.

#2 – Get the Hips Extended in Supine

Another common issue I see when people are doing glute bridge or supine hamstring variations is getting too much extension through the lower back.

They’re lying on their back, trying to extend their hips, and end up extending through the lower back instead.

To fix this, have them start with the knees bent and then work to exhale and tuck the pelvis using the lower abdominals.

Once they’re in this position, now ensure that they’re holding this position throughout the course of the exercise.

So if they’re doing a glute bridge, they only raise as high as they can while keeping the pelvis tucked and abdominals engaged.

The same goes for supine leg curl variations, like the ValSlide leg curl demonstrated below.

As you can see in this demo, I actually have E start at the top position versus at the bottom, as it allows him to set-up in a more ideal starting position.

Give this a run next time you’re in the gym – it’s a subtle tweak, but one I think will make a big difference in how your clients and athletes feel these exercises!

#3 – Reset Every Rep

Even though we’re focused mostly on accessory lifts, this next concept (and ensuing video) are applicable almost universally across the board.

Let’s come back to the squat as an example: If your client/athlete is doing a set of 5, they’re essentially “setting up” at the top position 5 times.

However, when they’re actually going through the set, they’re probably just trying to get through the set – and maybe not as worried about where they’re set up!

To remedy this, I often cue my clients and athletes to reset every rep. If you’re back squatting and you have a tendency to get pushed forward out of the bottom, you’ll often end up pushed forward (and on your toes) at the top.

So instead of simply trying to squat from this position, make a subtle shift back into a more ideal starting position.

Then do your next rep.

Then reset again, and do your next rep.

This video is a bit older, but it helps further explain my point:

Once you understand the concept, you can see it applies to a ton of different lifts.

On the RDL, make sure your clients/athletes reset, feel the whole foot, and then start to hinge back.

On half-kneeling variations where they’ll have a tendency to lean forward, have them shift their weight back and stack the knee/hip/shoulder in a straight line every rep.

Years ago, I remember Gray Cook making the following statement at a Perform Better Summit:

Don’t do 1 set of 5 – instead, do 5 sets of 1.

It’s such a subtle shift in mindset, but it will make a profound impact on your lifting technique.

#4 – Get the Hands Underneath the Shoulders on Core and Push-up Variations

Another really common issue I see when it comes to poor set-ups is having the hands either in front of, or behind, the shoulders in core training and push-up variations.

Take the birddog for example: It looks like such a simple exercise, but when done well, it’s very hard to stay stable and “own” the movement.

(And wow – how old does THIS video look?!?!?!)

What I often see is when someone puts their hands back behind their shoulders (closer to their waist), they want to shorten their core and use rectus abdominus to stabilize.

If someone puts their hands out in front of them, they really don’t want to reach from the appropriate area. It ends up being a reach through the mid back, or more of a shrug with the upper traps.

So this is a really simple fix – when someone is doing a Bear or Birddog, make sure they set-up with the hands underneath the shoulders, and the knees underneath the hips.

It sounds easy, but if you do this, it will make a massive impact on how these exercises feel.

#5 – Keep the Back Open when Squatting

I know every high-level powerlifter who reads this is probably going to freak out, but I’m honestly okay with that.

Arching your back like a “C” from top to bottom may be the best way to move World Record weights, but if you want to lift relatively heavy for as long as possible, you need to be able to squat while keeping the back open.

Doing so does a host of things for us:

  • It stacks the ribcage on top of the pelvis,
  • It forces us to rely more on muscle (versus joint) to create stability and control, and
  • It allows us to maximize our bodies current level of mobility.

Now this gets really tricky when you have a barbell on your back, as the natural tendency is to close the back and arch/extend to stabilize.

Instead, if you’re looking to open the upper back and re-groove that squat, consider starting with a plate or goblet squat instead.

Both of these variations allow your clients/athletes to reach (either through the hands or the elbows), and keep the upper back open.

Now a critical piece of the puzzle here is not just getting the reach at the start, but also keeping the reach throughout the course of the lift. It goes beyond just setting up, but it doesn’t make sense to dial in the set-up and then lose the reach when they actually squat!

Once you’ve re-grooved the pattern, feel free to start loading using 2-KB front squat or barbell front squat variations, but again, with an emphasis on driving the elbows forward.

If you’ve never tried this before, definitely give it a shot the next time you’re in the gym. I think you’ll love how these movements feel!

Summary

So there you have it – 5 simple things you can do right now, today, to improve your set-up and lifting technique in the gym.

Give them a shot, and once you have, report back here and let me know how it went!

All the best,
MR

The post 5 Simple Hacks You Can Use in the Gym TODAY appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Steve Calarco on Leveling Up Training and Nutrition with the Gen Pop

Fri, 04/12/2019 - 05:16

Steve Calarco is a Strength and Conditioning coach based out of Cromwell, Connecticut. During his ten years as a trainer. he has worked with a variety of clients, ranging from athletes as young as 9 years old, professional athletes, weekend warriors and of course the general population.

One of the reasons I asked Steve to be on this show is because of his tireless work ethic and focus on getting better. It seems like he’s always attending events, and I love how dedicated he is on leveling up his coaching game.

In this show, Steve and I talk about how losing a massive amount of weight early in life impacted his thoughts on training and nutrition, what the acronym ACE means (and why I’m going to be stealing it), and things we can all do from a training and nutrition perspective to get better results and enjoy life a little bit more.

 

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of this week’s show:

  • Show Intro:
    • SB19
    • The upcoming week
    • MR’s Deep Thought: Don’t Get Complacent!
  • Interview with Steve:
    • How Steve got started in the fitness industry, and what he learned from being overweight and losing a lot of weight early in his life.
    • Steve’s overarching philosophy on training and coaching.
    • His thoughts on finding a blend between “soft” and “hard” skills. Are there times when we’re actually not pushing our clients hard enough?
    • What a typical gen pop program would look like if Steve were your coach.
    • His approach to nutrition (and why there’s more to it than just eating!)
    • The value of having a coach, while being a coach yourself.
    • The BIG Question.
    • A really fun lightning round where we talk about the Beast Tamer challenge, the books he’s reading right now, and what it’s like to be the “Best Dressed Man in Fitness”

 

Related Links

Connect with Steve

Miscellaneous Links

Books Referenced

 

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients?

Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks by using a specific deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

 

Sharing is Caring!

Did you enjoy this episode?

Or maybe learn a thing or two from Steve and his thoughts on training the gen pop?

If so, please take the time and share it on social media. Or simply email this link to ONE PERSON who you think can benefit from it. Thank you!

The post Steve Calarco on Leveling Up Training and Nutrition with the Gen Pop appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Skinny vs. Showy Abs

Wed, 04/10/2019 - 05:00

A long, long, long, long, LONG time ago when I first started working out, I had numerous goals.

Obviously I wanted a huge bench (like every teenage boy does).

Second, I want to have big arms (again, like every teenage boy does).

And last but not least, I wanted to develop that “6-pack” in my abs.

Ah, the good ‘ol days…

And if we’re being honest, I think we can all admit that a 6-pack looks great.

But here’s the thing – those 6-pack muscles (the rectus abdominus) may look awesome when they’re lean and exposed, but they don’t do a ton for you with regards to improving and optimizing movement.

In this short video, I describe the difference between what I call “skinny” and “showy” abs, and how to get your skinny abs to do more of the work for you!

Now that you’ve watched the video, here are a few extra thoughts to consider:

  • The rectus abdominus isn’t a major player in aligning the ribcage and pelvis. If you look at the rectus abdominus, it doesn’t have a ton of pull on either the ribcage or the pelvis. Therefore if we want to to optimize movement (and stack the ribcage on the pelvis), we should be more focused on our “skinny” abs – our obliques and transverse abdominus.
  • When performing most exercises, don’t allow the core to “shorten” or “crunch.” Instead, think about keeping the spine in a neutral alignment, reaching, and working to stack the ribcage on top of the pelvis.
  • If someone is struggling with the ribs or chest popping up, cue the client/athlete to reach and drive the ribcage back. It might help to place your hand on their upper back to give them a target position to shoot for.
  • If someone is losing position of the pelvis, cue the client/athlete to exhale and lift the belt buckle up. If they’re doing a plank, you can also “rake” their abdominals using their hands. If they’re on their back, consider placing your hand in between the floor and their lower back, while asking them to “crush” your hand by engaging the abdominals.

Proper positioning of the pelvis and ribcage are key, and if you can get your clients and athletes to better utilize their “skinny abs,” I guarantee you’ll see more long-term success in your training programs.

I hope this helps and have a great day!

All the best,
MR

The post Skinny vs. Showy Abs appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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5 Things Clients and Athletes Want from Their Coach

Mon, 04/08/2019 - 05:00

A few years ago I had an amazing chat with my good friend Eric Oetter of the Memphis Grizzlies.

And while EO and I always seem to have amazing chats, the discussion we had that day still stands out in my mind.

That discussion focused on writing programs, and specifically, the idea of checking boxes.

Consider this: When you write a program, or coach a session, who are you checking boxes for?

Are you checking boxes for yourself?

You know, mythical things like the perfect program for this client/athlete?

Or the unicorn that is perfect technique?

OR, are you checking boxes for your clients and athletes?

And trust me, I realize there’s a fine line here.

But when I reflect on my career and the numerous mistakes I’ve made throughout it, one of the worst was was checking way more boxes for myself rather than for the clients/athletes I was serving early-on.

Quite simply, it was way more about ME than it was about THEM.

In this article, I’m going to do my best to outline five things that (most of) your clients and athletes want from their coach.

It’s definitely biased by my time in the private sector.

And I’m sure there are certain clients (or certain situations) where these may not be appropriate.

But I think by-and-large, if you follow the tips I outline in this article, you’re going to have far more success as a trainer or coach going forward.

Let’s do this!

#1 – They Want to Have Fun

Let’s start with what appears to be a little-known fact for most trainers and coaches….

Most people don’t love to work out.

(And the few of us that do often end up making it our jobs!)

But in all seriousness, most people work out so they can be more awesome somewhere else in life.

Maybe they want to have more energy at work, or for their kiddos when they come home after a long day.

Maybe they want to be a better athlete on the field, court or pitch.

And maybe they want to use their workouts as a place to feel good about themselves and burn off some excess stress.

But let’s be real here – if someone doesn’t like working out, and then they perceive their workouts to be boring on top of that, what do you think is the likelihood that they’re going to stick with it?

I’m feeling nice so I’ll give you the answer – somewhere between ZERO and NONE.

Now I’m not saying you need to be a professional comedian during your coaching sessions.

Nor am I saying that you need to “switch things up” every single workout.

But I think it’s critical to find ways to make training sessions fun if you want people to stick with it.

For me, the following mix tends to work really well:

  1. I try to keep the mood light and I love to joke around,
  2. I use a variety of tools in my sessions (bands, med balls, various bars, kettlebells, dumbbells, etc.) to decrease monotony, and
  3. I always try to keep similar clients/athletes in a group (whenever possible).

Now everyone’s recipe for a “fun” training session is going to look and feel a bit different.

But I can assure you – if you find a way to keep things fun and fresh, your clients and athletes are going to love training with you.

#2 – They Want to Feel Challenged

One of the worst things you can do as a trainer or coach is underwhelm a client or athlete early-on in their training with you.

And I can make that statement with a lot of confidence, because I know there are times when I lost clients and athletes early in my career simply because I wasn’t pushing them hard enough.

Part of this was due to a limited training lens (i.e. everything in my workouts were mostly done with barbells and dumbbells), and part of it was due to my ego – thinking that I always knew what was “right.”

Now I’m all for erring on the side of caution, but you have to find ways to challenge your clients and athletes during their workouts.

If you can’t load someone as much as you’d like in the R5 (Resistance) portion of their workout, try going a little harder with the conditioning on the back-end.

If someone doesn’t deal well with eccentric forces, have them do something more concentric-focused like dragging a sled or pushing a Prowler.

Or when in doubt, you can always cut the rest periods and increase the density of a session to make someone feel like they got a good workout in.

At the end of the day, find ways to make clients feel challenged in their sessions, while at the same time remembering that…

#3 – They Want to Feel Safe

It may seem like I’m talking out of both sides of my mouth here (especially after my previous point!), but let’s be real:

No one wants to get hurt working out in the gym.

Even your most hardcore clients, the ones who are most willing to push their limits and test their boundaries, don’t want to get hurt working out.

It’s your job as a coach to find that perfect blend of pushing an athlete hard enough, yet doing so in a safe manner that doesn’t expose them to unnecessary risk o finjury.

Part of this is proper exercise selection.

Part of it is keeping a watchful eye on their technique.

But perhaps the biggest part of it all is just a healthy dose of common sense!

I won’t belabor this point any further, because it should be pretty straight-forward.

Do everything in your power to keep your clients and athletes healthy and injury-free while training with you.

#4 – They Want to Feel Supported

Regardless of what the social media streams might tell you, every day isn’t puppies and balloons.

Or unicorns and rainbows.

Just like us, our clients and athletes are going to have good days and bad when they come in the gym.

And while you may think of yourself as someone who just doles out an effective training program, I think most of our clients look at us as something much more.

In this day and age connectivity is highest but feeling connected and close is lowest. As such, many of your clients and athletes will turn to you in times of need.

And when they do – what will your response be?

It may not be the most glamorous portion of our job, but when you pick someone up when they’re feeling down, that’s what truly builds rapport.

That’s what builds real relationships.

Sometimes it’s listening to their issues, warming them up, and still getting a solid training session in.

And other times, it’s going totally off script with the workout so you can simply be there for them and empathize with what’s going on in their life.

Make it a goal of yours to be a positive support system for your clients and athletes.

I guarantee if you do this, you’ll NEVER have a retention issue in your business.

#5 – They Want to Feel Understood

Last but not least, you need to find ways to make your clients and athletes feel understood with regards to the outcome they want.

Case and point…

You could write the greatest training program known to man, but if you can’t make it relatable to the client/athlete standing in front of you, chances are compliance isn’t going to be all that great!

This actually ties in nicely to my point above about making clients/athletes feel challenged.

In the past if I had a client/athlete who didn’t move particularly well, or had a specific movement limitation, I did a ton of stuff early-on to address that issue.

I would obsess over their programming, or deliberately hold them back with regards to exercise selection if technique wasn’t picture perfect.

But in doing so, I not only underwhelmed them within the training session, but they probably felt as though I wasn’t listening with regards to their needs and goals outside of the session, either!

This is a point I’m constantly trying to relay to my staff at IFAST.

Do we want all of our clients and athletes to move well?

Absolutely!

But there are also times when I’m okay with B-level movement quality (assuming we are loading and challenging them appropriately) so they keep coming back.

Because I know that with time, eventually that B-level movement will become a B+.

And then an A-.

And them someday, hopefully, an A.

But we never get that opportunity if we don’t make our clients and athletes feel understood, and find ways to incorporate the things they perceive to be valuable in their workouts.

Summary

So there you have it – 5 things clients and athletes want from their coach.

But as always, this wasn’t meant to be an exhaustive list.

What things would you add?

Or do you think that are important for not only getting more clients/athletes, but retaining them as well?

I look forward to your thoughts and feedback below!

All the best,
MR

The post 5 Things Clients and Athletes Want from Their Coach appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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Joel Smith on Developing Linear Speed in Team Sports Athletes

Fri, 04/05/2019 - 05:00

Joel Smith, is an NCAA Division I Strength Coach working in the PAC12 conference.  He has been a track and field jumper and javelin thrower, track coach, strength coach, personal trainer, researcher, writer and lecturer.

Joel also runs the incredibly popular JustFlySports.com website, where he has a ton of awesome articles and podcasts.

In this show, Joel and I go in-depth talking about speed. We cover the role that weights, plyos and medicine balls should play in your programs, how to train force vs. elastic athletes, and much, much more.

Quite simply if you want to make your athletes faster, you’re going to love this show.

 

Show Notes

Here’s a brief overview of this week’s show:

  • Show Intro:
    • MR’s Weekend Recap
    • Looking forward to the Team Robertson Final 4 Party
    • Weekly Thought: Find Ways to Give Back
  • Interview with Joel:
    • How he got started in the world of physical preparation.
    • His overarching philosophy on speed development for team athletes (and why there’s more to it than just “running” in your sessions).
    • The role of a basic strength program in developing speed – and when strength training actually detracts from improvements in speed.
    • How much is too much? Finding out how much direct speed training you need to make your athletes faster.
    • What a typical speed session looks like for Joel and his athletes.
    • Jumps and throws – what’s their role? When do you use them? And how do you fit them into a complete program?
    • The role the foot and ankle complex play in speed development.
    • The BIG Question.

 

Related Links

Connect with Joel

Miscellaneous Articles and Videos

View this post on Instagram

Getting @jeskobar10 to feel the transverse plane and stay squatted. Result: Big PB in 30m sprint. One of many things learned from @nonsense_sportstraining and part of ideology seen in upcoming Speed Strength book to go on presale shortly. My favorite part of this clip may be the pvc pipe square spinning in the air. #acceleration #sprinting #strengthandconditioning #athletics #100m #tracknation

A post shared by Joel Smith (@justflysports) on Oct 23, 2018 at 4:02pm PDT

 

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients?

Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks by using a specific deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

 

Sharing is Caring!

Did you enjoy this episode?

Or maybe learn a thing or two from Joel and his thoughts on speed training?

If so, please take the time and share it on social media. Or simply email  this link to ONE PERSON who you think can benefit from it. Thank you!

The post Joel Smith on Developing Linear Speed in Team Sports Athletes appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

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