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Elite Physical Preparation and Sports Performance Training
Updated: 9 hours 41 min ago

9 Ways to Survive “Off Days” in the Gym

Fri, 01/18/2019 - 06:04

Training to be the best version of yourself every day is everyone’s fitness mantra. Despite all the motivational talk, though, you will have days where you just can’t even. You know, days where you just aren’t in the mood to lift, run, or even get out of bed!

We all have those days and it’s nothing out of the ordinary, but what do you do when those days hit you?

On today’s episode, I share 9 sure-fire tips on surviving (and potentially thriving) during your off days.

I explain each tip, as well as share specific exercise and mindset recommendations.

I give you my go-to training hack when I’m not in the mood to train.

And I also share advice on how to prevent injuries, and how modifying your workout and exercise routine can impact your overall fitness success.

 

Do your best, but if it’s not happening that day then it’s not happening. That’s okay. Live to fight another day.

  

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • What you do when you don’t feel like going to the gym.
  • Forming the right mindset that will motivate you to get out and train.
  • The warm-up hack and how it helps with your commitment to fitness.
  • What it means to extend your warm-ups and how it ties in to your hobbies.
  • How to prevent self-inflicted injuries during training day.
  • Modifying your exercises to fit your current mood.
  • How to modify alternative circuit training to suit your conditioning needs.
  • Exercise recommendations you can do when you’re not in the mood.

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review.

And we’d love to connect on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as well. Thanks for your support!

The post 9 Ways to Survive “Off Days” in the Gym appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Danny Mackey on Trial, Effect, and Coaching Runners

Fri, 01/11/2019 - 05:00

Danny Mackey is a former Hansons-Brooks runner, Olympic Trials qualifier and currently the Head Coach of the Brooks Beasts Track Club. The Brooks Beasts is a running team owned by one of the top clubs in the US dedicated to middle and long-distance runners. He has a Master’s degree in Exercise Physiology and Biomechanics, has experience working at Nike’s Sports Research Lab, and has coached Olympians and various collegiate athletes.

Danny joins me today to share his passion for running and coaching. He describes his thought process and how he manages to provide a unique approach with every athlete he trains. He explains what it means to incorporate trial & effect in your training and the difference in training techniques for middle-distance runners and long-distance runners. He also explains his exercise protocols when it comes to weight training, cardio, and conditioning.

 

It’s trial and effect, and sometimes you make mistakes. – Danny Mackey

 

This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • Danny’s professional background and the kind of clients he works with.
  • What led him to the world of physical preparation?
  • His definition of middle- and long-distance running.
  • Why middle-distance athletes train harder than other athletes.
  • His principles when teaching clients and how he helps them achieve their potential.
  • Preparing his athletes for competition and how they incorporate minimum effective doses.
  • Weightlifting protocols he uses for his clients.
  • Some of the problems he encounters in working with runners.
  • His criteria for following someone on Twitter.

Resources Mentioned:

 

Connect with Danny:

 

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media!

The post Danny Mackey on Trial, Effect, and Coaching Runners appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Brett Uttley on Tactical Periodization and Performance in Soccer

Fri, 01/04/2019 - 05:00

Brett Uttley is the founder of TOG Soccer and the Assistant Coach for the Rio Grande Valley Toros of the United Soccer League, the Houston Dynamo’s second team in Major League Soccer. Prior to serving as the first assistant coach for the Rio Grande Valley, he worked as the fitness coach for the Seattle Sounders’ USLPro reserve team as well as the Seattle Sounders’ U-13 Academy team’s head coach. He has a master’s degree in Recreation and Sports Sciences with a special focus on Soccer Coaching from Ohio University as well as a MBP Master Certification in High-Performance Soccer from the MBP School of Coaches, a coaching course in Barcelona, Spain.

Brett joins me today to discuss tactical periodization and performance in the world of soccer. He explains what tactical periodization is and how soccer coaches can use it to improve their practice design. He explains the importance of understanding roles and how it relates to the team’s sports performance as well as why sports athletes need to understand the model and play style their coach want. He also shares how to create drills that give athletes the context they need to perform at a high level.

 

As a coach, when you’re executing a training exercise on the field, you should more or less understand the physical requirements of that exercise & the demands being imposed on the players. – Brett Uttley

  

This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • What inspired Brett to begin a career in sports coaching and physical preparation.
  • The importance of athletes understanding their roles within the confines of their team and style of play.
  • Why it’s critical for sports coaches to help athletes cope with the “emotional rush” of playing a professional sport.
  • What is tactical periodization?
  • The four primary principles of the tactical periodization method.
  • The micro-cycles of the tactical periodization method and how they help players train and prepare between games.
  • The four phases of a professional sports game and how the tactical periodization method applies to each phase.
  • Why it’s critical to understand the game, play style, and model before applying tactical periodization methods to your practice sessions.
  • Brett’s perspective on strength training in pro sports and its role in his training programs.
  • Why he believes it is critical for young athletes to optimize their game intelligence before focusing on the physical demands of the sport.
  • His experience while living in Barcelona for four months.

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

Connect with Brett:

 

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media!

The post Brett Uttley on Tactical Periodization and Performance in Soccer appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Mark Fisher on Unicorns, Ninjas, and Business Success

Fri, 12/28/2018 - 05:00

Mark Fisher is the co-founder of Mark Fisher Fitness, one of the most eccentric and successful fitness gyms of the fitness industry. In 2015, the MFF was recognized as one of Inc. 500’s fastest growing companies in America as well as one of the Top 20 Gyms in America by Men’s Health.

In addition to leading one of the most unique fitness gyms in the world, Mark is also the co-founder of Business for Unicorns, a coaching and consulting company helping business owners become exceptional entrepreneurs.

Mark joins me to discuss how he created Mark Fisher Fitness and how it has evolved since its inception. He describes how he came up with the use of unicorns and ninjas for branding and how it helped propel his business upward.

He also discusses why he stopped acting to pursue a career in fitness, and describes the kind of coach he has become. He also explains why he believes there’s no such thing as the best coach for everyone, the biggest mistakes he has seen trainers and fitness entrepreneurs make throughout his coaching career, and what “creating the city you want to live in” means to him.

 

When you have a business, it’s an opportunity to create the city you want to live in. – Mark Fisher

 

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • Mark’s career before he founded Mark Fisher Fitness.
  • How he got started in the fitness industry.
  • Why he transitioned from acting to working in fitness and what his business looks like today.
  • How their business evolved to fit the needs of their clients in the last seven years.
  • The reason behind the funny characters they use for their branding.
  • Common mistakes trainers make from a business point of view.
  • The biggest mistake he’s made and the lesson he learned from it.
  • Why he’s interested in speaking at seminars and the topics he likes to talk about.
  • What we can expect from Mark Fisher in the near future.

 

Mark Fisher’s Life & Training Advice for Fitness Coaches:

 

  • Being the best trainer is not synonymous to being the best coach a person will ever meet.
  • You can’t ever stop marketing. That’s one of the worst mistakes a business owner can make.
  • Accept everyone as they are and always come from a place of service to provide clients with the experience they expect.
  • The second you appeal to everybody you appeal to nobody.

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

 

Connect with Mark:

 

 

 

Make 2019 Your Best Year Yet!

Are you ready to take your health and fitness training to the next level and make 2019 your best year yet? The best way to achieve your fitness goals, improve your training techniques, and create healthier habits is by working with a coach.

At Robertson Training Systems, we want to help you feel great while getting stronger, improving your mindset, and achieving your fitness goals!

To do this, we want to invite you to join one of our coaching programs: the RTS Online Coaching Platform or our Annual Training Group Program to maximize your performance and ensure you’re making progress toward your goals.

 

RTS Online Coaching Platform:

With the RTS Online Coaching Platform, you’ll:

  • Work directly with me to create a customized coaching program specific to your unique needs and goals.
  • Receive an updated workout strategy each month to ensure your program is challenging, yet rewarding.
  • Frequent communications with me to ensure your workout is on-point and you’re making progress each month

To join the RTS Online Coaching Platform, visit RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Coaching

 

Annual Training Group Program:

My Annual Training Group Program is more than just a training program!

In this program, we’ll focus on the four phases of physical training, which include:

  1. Building the Engine
  2. Leaning Season
  3. Athletic Domination, and
  4. Getting Strong(er)

You’ll also receive new monthly workouts to follow and set monthly challenges to develop strong habits in nutrition, recovery, and mindset.

To sign up for the Annual Training Group Program, visit: RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Annual

Let’s make 2019 your best fitness year yet!

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review.

And last but not least, please connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and please share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media!

The post Mark Fisher on Unicorns, Ninjas, and Business Success appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Chidi Enyia on Building Explosive Speed, Strength and Power with Potentiation

Fri, 12/21/2018 - 05:00

Chidi Enyia is a Sprints, Hurdles, and Jumps Coach for ALTIS, a fitness company designed to provide an environment where elite track and field athletes can grow to become better at their chosen sport. They have state-of-the-art training facilities, a robust clientele, and professional and certified coaches.

He has over 20 years experience training athletes at the high school, collegiate, and professional levels. Before he started his journey with ALTIS, Chidi was a sprints coach for the track team at Southern Illinois University.

Chidi joins me today to discuss the concept of potentiation and how he applies its science to his athletes. He shares his story on how he became passionate about fitness and how he survived cancer. He describes what potentiation is and the principles behind it as well as explains how coaches can apply potentiation to any sport. He also shares examples of training routines and advice on how to be a great coach when your athletes are experiencing mental hurdles.

Potentiation is a physiological condition where the force exerted by a muscle is increased due to a pre-conditioning activity or contraction. – Chidi Enyia

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • What potentiation is and how to apply it to athletic fitness.
  • Chidi’s early career, his bout with cancer, and what he’s doing today.
  • The lessons he’s learned after surviving cancer and how he applies them to his coaching.
  • The three primary neurophysiological mechanisms responsible for potentiation.
  • How he uses the concept of potentiation with his clients.
  • Examples of integrated potentiation in training.
  • The amount of time you should devote for potentiation exercise.
  • The mistakes he made in implementing potentiation training to his athletes.
  • Knowing when potentiation training is working and how to fix it.
  • The recommended potentiation training and activities for team sports.

Chidi Enyia’s Life & Training Advice for Fitness Coaches:

  • As you evolve as a coach, you don’t break out all the great tricks you have on day one.
  • Be brave enough to take risks and to make decisions, but still look for context.
  • Experience will teach you to be more accurate as a coach, but it won’t make you immune to making mistakes.

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Chidi Enyia:

 

Make 2019 Your Best Year Yet!

Are you ready to take your health and fitness training to the next level and make 2019 your best year yet? The best way to achieve your fitness goals, improve your training techniques, and create healthier habits is by working with a coach.

At Robertson Training Systems, we want to help you feel great while getting stronger, improving your mindset, and achieving your fitness goals!

To do this, we want to invite you to join one of our coaching programs: the RTS Online Coaching Platform or our Annual Training Group Program to maximize your performance and ensure you’re making progress toward your goals.

RTS Online Coaching Platform:

With the RTS Online Coaching Platform, you’ll:

  • Work directly with me to create a customized coaching program specific to your unique needs and goals.
  • Receive an updated workout strategy each month to ensure your program is challenging, yet rewarding.
  • Frequent communications with me to ensure your workout is on-point and you’re making progress each month

To join the RTS Online Coaching Platform, visit RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Coaching

Annual Training Group Program:

My Annual Training Group Program is more than just a training program!

In this program, we’ll focus on the four phases of physical training, which include:

  1. Building the Engine
  2. Leaning Season
  3. Athletic Domination
  4. and getting Strong(er)

You’ll also receive new monthly workouts to follow and set monthly challenges to develop strong habits in nutrition, recovery, and mindset.

To sign up for the Annual Training Group Program, visit: RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Annual

Let’s make 2019 your best fitness year yet!

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review.

And please, connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!

The post Chidi Enyia on Building Explosive Speed, Strength and Power with Potentiation appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

5 Ways to Use Discomfort to Unlock Massive Growth

Fri, 12/14/2018 - 06:10

No one likes the idea of being forced to do something you’re just not good at.

It makes us feel uncomfortable, unconfident, and weak.

However, the road to optimal growth involves walking the road less traveled. It’s certainly easier said than done, and you can definitely make one too many mistakes if you don’t know what you’re doing.

So, how exactly do we use personal discomforts to become a better version of ourselves?

On today’s episode, I share 5 ways you can use discomfort to unlock massive growth. I describe how you can use weaknesses to take yourself to another level of not just fitness, but personal growth as well. I share stories of my personal struggles and how I taught myself to overcome them. I explain each of the five ways in detail, adding tips to make each step easier to manage. I also discuss how you can apply these steps to other facets of your life.

 

Acknowledging a weakness is one thing, but actually doing something about it is another. – Mike Robertson

 

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • Being clear on your goals for 2019 and how you should do it.
  • Using discomfort to release your full fitness potential.
  • What holds most of us back from achieving our goals.
  • Writing down your strengths and defining your weaknesses.
  • Facing your fears and addressing your weak points.
  • Why feedback from other people matters when it comes to growth.
  • Knowing the kind of criticism you respond optimally.
  • How surrounding yourself with better people can improve your life.
  • What ‘embracing the suck’ means and how it applies to progress.

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

Make 2019 Your Best Year Yet!

Are you ready to take your health and fitness training to the next level and make 2019 your best year yet? The best way to achieve your fitness goals, improve your training techniques, and create healthier habits is by working with a coach.

At Robertson Training Systems, I want to help you feel great while getting stronger, improving your mindset, and achieving your fitness goals!

To do this, we want to invite you to join one of our coaching programs: the RTS Online Coaching Platform or our Annual Training Group Program to maximize your performance and ensure you’re making progress toward your goals.

 

RTS Online Coaching Platform:

With the RTS Online Coaching Platform, you’ll:

  • Work directly with me to create a customized coaching program specific to your unique needs and goals.
  • Receive an updated workout strategy each month to ensure your program is challenging, yet rewarding.
  • Frequent communications with me to ensure your workout is on-point and you’re making progress each month

To join the RTS Online Coaching Platform, visit RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Coaching

 

Annual Training Group:

My Annual Training Group Program is more than just a training program!

In this program, we’ll focus on the four phases of physical training, which include:

  1. Building the Engine
  2. Leaning Season
  3. Athletic Domination
  4. and getting Strong(er)

You’ll also receive new monthly workouts to follow and set monthly challenges to develop strong habits in nutrition, recovery, and mindset.

To sign up for the Annual Training Group Program, visit: RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Annual

Let’s make 2019 your best fitness year yet!

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review.

Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

And don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media!

The post 5 Ways to Use Discomfort to Unlock Massive Growth appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Fergus Connolly on Winning and Success at Every Level

Fri, 12/07/2018 - 10:41

Fergus Connolly is hailed as one of the best performance and conditioning coaches in the world. He is the author of the book Game Changer, where he explains how he trains his athletes to achieve peak physical condition through the art of sports science.

He’s among the top choices for performance and conditioning coaches when it comes to professional sports, military, and even business teams. He is the only coach to have experienced occupying full-time positions in every major sport such as soccer, football, and rugby.

Fergus joins me today to share his wisdom on true physical conditioning and how coaches should train their athletes. He shares the story of how he got into the fitness industry, the people he took inspiration from, and the breaks he got that propelled his career to the top. He also shares his thoughts on what’s involved in peak conditioning and explains what makes a team successful as well as shares some of his upcoming books and the ideas behind them.

 

“Your only real competition is yourself.” – Fergus Connolly

 

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • How Fergus got started in the world of physical preparation.
  • Why the overarching philosophy is winning.
  • How he found success across multiple sports and cultures.
  • His academic and career highlights.
  • How he addresses physical weak points in his clients.
  • The challenges coaches face in coaching athletes.
  • His advice to coaches in physically preparing their athletes.
  • The common themes in any successful team.
  • What inspired him to write the book 59 Lessons?
  • Why he wouldn’t change anything in his life even if given a chance.

 

Fergus Connolly’s Life & Training Advice for Young Athletes:

  • Be humble, be aware, and smile because a smile will get you a long, long way.
  • Don’t work for work’s sake; it’s about the quality of work.
  • When it comes to physical preparation, it’s all about getting better all the time.

 

Resources Mentioned:

 

Connect with Fergus Connolly:

 

Make 2019 Your Best Year Yet!

Are you ready to take your health and fitness training to the next level and make 2019 your best year yet? The best way to achieve your fitness goals, improve your training techniques, and create healthier habits is by working with a coach.

At Robertson Training Systems, we want to help you feel great while getting stronger, improving your mindset, and achieving your fitness goals!

To do this, we want to invite you to join one of our coaching programs: the RTS Online Coaching Platform or our Annual Training Group Program to maximize your performance and ensure you’re making progress toward your goals.

 

RTS Online Coaching Platform:

With the RTS Online Coaching Platform, you’ll:

  • Work directly with me to create a customized coaching program specific to your unique needs and goals.
  • Receive an updated workout strategy each month to ensure your program is challenging, yet rewarding.
  • Frequent communications with me to ensure your workout is on-point and you’re making progress each month

To join the RTS Online Coaching Platform, visit RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Coaching

 

Annual Training Group Program:

My Annual Training Group Program is more than just a training program!

In this program, we’ll focus on the four phases of physical training, which include:

  1. Building the Engine
  2. Leaning Season
  3. Athletic Domination, and
  4. Getting Strong(er)

You’ll also receive new monthly workouts to follow and set monthly challenges to develop strong habits in nutrition, recovery, and mindset.

To sign up for the Annual Training Group Program, visit: RobertsonTrainingSystems.com/Annual

Let’s make 2019 your best fitness year yet!

 

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or visit our website. Don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media.

The post Fergus Connolly on Winning and Success at Every Level appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Andy McCloy on Impact, Influence and Finding Balance

Thu, 11/29/2018 - 18:40

Andy McCloy is the owner of BCI Sports Performance and Fitness, an Alabama-based fitness company providing a wide range of performance enhancement and strength training programs to clients ranging from high school and college players to pro athletes.

Their goal at BCI is to have each client reach a higher level of athleticism which will translate to higher levels of performance. His philosophy is built around what he calls the “Wheel of Conditioning,” where the body is the wheel and each aspect of fitness is equally recognized so it rolls efficiently.

Andy joins me today to discuss his program and how they help their clients achieve peak physical performance. He shares the story of when he had his hips replaced and how it changed his life, as well as his career, for the better.

He describes the scholarship program they offer and the clients they accept for it.

And he reveals why being connected is not the same as being engaged and the significant changes he applied in his personal life that enabled him to achieve a balance between his life, career, and fitness.

Put in your family and your self-care first, then build everything else around it. – Andy McCloy

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • Andy’s passion for fitness and how having hip replacement surgery impacted his life and career.
  • The changes he applied to his everyday life and how it changed the way he provides service.
  • How his scholarship program works and what it offers clients.
  • Strategies he implemented that helped him find better balance.
  • Why connectivity is both a blessing and a curse.
  • What his everyday routine looks like and how he sustains it.
  • The mistakes he made and the lessons he learned from them.
  • Advice to up and coming coaches who want to be more successful.
  • His career highlights as a coach and his plans for the future.

Andy McCloy’s Life & Training Advice for Young Athletes:

  • Do not trade connections for engagements.
  • It’s impossible to balance two things when they don’t weigh the same

Connect with Andy McCloy:

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

The post Andy McCloy on Impact, Influence and Finding Balance appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Building World Class Strength with Matt Wenning

Fri, 11/23/2018 - 19:03

Matt Wenning is a private strength coach, elite powerlifter, and strength training seminar facilitator. He is the founder of Wenning Strength as well as the Director and Co-Founder of Ludus Magnus, a premier performance center in Columbus, Ohio.

Matt is also a government contractor who has helped thousands of civilian and military personnel, from ground infantry to Army Ranger regiments as well as Border Patrol employees, various fire departments, NFL athletes, and Olympic competitors. He holds a Bachelors degree in Exercise Physiology, a Masters degree in Sports Biomechanics, and is a multiple award-winning powerlifter, which includes three World Records as well as several national and state records.

On today’s episode, Matt shares how a display of brutal honesty opened the doors for him to work with the government. He shares his techniques for boosting performance while decreasing the risk of injury as well as why short-term goals lead to long-term failure. He elaborates on his training mantra ‘modify, not miss,’ his strategy for switching from a high-intensity workout to a low-intensity high-volume workout, and how it can positively your results.

Understand that short-term goals lead to long-term failures. You need to have the big picture in mind. – Matt Wenning

 This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • Matt’s early lifting days in Indiana, and how he eventually became a physical preparation training and strength conditioning coach.
  • How having a degree helped him gain more media exposure — and ultimately, a chance to develop training programs for the military.
  • How his initial modified training program for the rangers significantly improved their performance and reduced their injury rate in a relatively short amount of time.
  • How his training programs helped identify physical weaknesses and areas for improvement in thousands of soldiers and firemen.
  • His incredible powerlifting world records, and how he got that strong.
  • How learning, understanding, and rotating different kinds of pressure can minimize injuries.
  • The idea of switching from high-intensity to high-volume, low-intensity in the interest of consistency.
  • What prompted him to build his own equipment.
  • His physical fitness career highlights.
  • His thoughts on the SWIS Conference and Dr. Kim Kinakin.
  • The first time he met his training idol, Ed Coan.
  • His one regret in life-related to training and/or fitness.

Matt Wenning’s Life & Training Advice for Young Athletes:

  • Short-term goals lead to long-term failures. Never lose sight of the big picture.
  • Have patience and understand that you cannot keep acquiring injuries. Keep all those wear and tear things down.
  • Focus on areas where you need the most work.
  • Don’t always focus on the things that you like — focus on the things that you need.
  • Understand that you have to rotate the different types of stimulus.

Resources Mentioned:

Connect with Matt Wenning:

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or visit our website. Don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media

The post Building World Class Strength with Matt Wenning appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Weight Training in the World of Soccer

Fri, 11/16/2018 - 05:00

Weight training practitioners were shocked by recent comments from English Premiere League coach Maurizio Sarri, where he claimed to ban his players from lifting weights.

Those controversial statements emphasized the apparent disconnect between the prevailing “old-school” mindset in soccer training and current perspectives on strength and resistance training.

What approach can be taken in reconciling these two different takes on athletic training?

More importantly, does weight training really have a role in the world of soccer?

On today’s episode, I share my insights on both the coach’s comments and how weight training plays a crucial role in soccer preparation. I discuss why we need to set aside our biases whenever we are presented with statements that run contrary to our beliefs, as well as some of the questions that we need to ask in order to see the other side’s perspective more clearly.

And I also share the story of how one of my soccer players for the Indy XI consistently improved his performance and got stronger over the course of three years with a smart strength and conditioning program.

If you can open up those lines of communication and have better dialogue with those practitioners that you come in contact with, that’s how we can take our field and industry to the next level. – Mike Robertson

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • The controversial quotes from Chelsea coach Maurizio Sarri that got weight training aficionados talking.
  • The questions that must be asked when contextualizing such statements.
  • Overcoming your own biases when it comes to fitness and staying open to new approaches.
  • Whether or not it is true that “nobody does weights” in soccer training — and if the same applies to resistance training.
  • A brief look at the differences between American football and American soccer.
  • How proper strength and resistance training can make a massive impact with regard to health.
  • The story of a pro athlete whose decision to train more seriously improved his game over the course of three years.
  • How strength and resistance training early on can benefit an athlete as they approach the end of their career.
  • The term “weights,” and why it is so polarizing.
  • The ways in which soccer culture gets physical preparation culture wrong.
  • The importance of sprinting to soccer players.
  • A surefire recipe for a soccer fitness regime that builds strength and considers the 7 Rs of program design without the need for weight training.

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or visit our website. Don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media.

The post Weight Training in the World of Soccer appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

How to Build Elite Olympic Weightlifters with Travis Mash

Fri, 11/09/2018 - 04:50

Travis Mash is the founder of Mash Elite Performance, a world-class training company responsible for coaching the most successful weightlifting team in America – Team Mash Elite.

Travis’ company also coaches and trains several NBA and NFL players, elite powerlifters, children and high school athletes as well as ‘Average Joes.’ He is a former World Champion and World Record Holder in powerlifting and has competed at the national level in Olympic weightlifting. Travis has spent many years studying and training, and is recognized as one of the few people in the fitness industry to blend the worlds of athletic strength and conditioning, powerlifting, and Olympic weightlifting.

Travis joins me today to share his insight on how to build outstanding elite Olympic weightlifters. He shares some of the biggest mistakes he sees from beginner and advanced Olympic lifters and tips on how to avoid them. And he also explains the difference in setup and performance between the snatch and the clean lifts, how he helps his clients overcome their fear of hook grips, and the secret for turning good athletes into elite weightlifters.

Even though we are asymmetrical in nature – the goal is to work toward symmetry because that is going to form a great athlete. – Travis Mash

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • My perspective on creating a balance between your work, family, and fitness.
  • How Travis got started in Olympic weightlifting.
  • His philosophy for coaching Olympic weightlifters.
  • How he assesses new athletes interested in Olympic weightlifting.
  • The Power Positions he uses when coaching Olympic weightlifters.
  • How he teaches his clients to achieve a neutral spine while training.
  • The biggest challenges people face when they start to snatch.
  • The difference in set up and performance between the snatch and the clean lifts.
  • Why he prefers starting new Olympic weightlifters on the snatch lift.
  • How he coaches clients to overcome their fear and anxiety with hook grips.
  • How he achieves optimal performance with the jerk.
  • How much should you dip?
  • His philosophy on using squats to build the lifts.
  • Similarities and differences in the training programs he designs for beginners versus elite Olympic weightlifting athletes.
  • The length of a typical training session.
  • Where Olympic lifts fit into an athlete’s program.
  • His current career highlights.
  • Which sport is harder to compete in – powerlifting or Olympic weightlifting?

Travis Mash’s Life & Fitness Training Advice for Young Athletes:

  • Find a mentor early.

Connect with Travis Mash:

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or visit our website. Don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media.

The post How to Build Elite Olympic Weightlifters with Travis Mash appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Kelly Starrett on Building the Mobility WOD Empire

Fri, 11/02/2018 - 05:00

Kelly Starrett is a physical therapist, coach, speaker, and author of the book Becoming a Supple Leopard. He is also the Founder of Mobility WOD, a fitness program that focuses on giving people the ability to do basic maintenance on themselves through pain elimination, injury prevention, and performance optimization.

Kelly joins me today to share his passion for fitness and the principles he wants other fitness enthusiasts to live by. He describes the story of how he found fitness, his inspirations and the challenges he faced, and why he started Mobility WOD. He explains how the internet has changed things in the fitness industry forever as well as some of its pros and cons. He also shares sage advice on what it takes to establish your own fitness brand and his insight on what the future holds for his business.

“Strength and conditioning is going to be the salvation towards population health.” – Kelly Starrett

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:

  • The changes the internet brought to the fitness industry.
  • Kelly’s story and how he became enthusiastic about strength training.
  • The challenges he faced when he was just starting out – and how he beat them.
  • How to properly do traditional exercises such as the squat.
  • Why he started filming himself doing various exercise movements.
  • The programs he used as references for his programs and videos.
  • The lessons he has learned in creating fitness and coaching content.
  • His advice to fitness enthusiasts who want to have their own brand.
  • His daily routine and how he sustains it.
  • His career highlights and what we can forward to in the future.
  • His favorite comeback stories and how they inspire him.

Kelly Starrett’s Life & Training Advice for Young Athletes:

  • Be authentic, be yourself, serve the people you’re serving, and be patient.
  • When you see something on the internet, stop having an emotional reaction to it.
  • Discipline is freedom, and there’s no substitution for practice.
  • You have to be willing to be part of someone’s success to become successful yourself.

Related Links:

Connect with Kelly Starrett:

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes. If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or visit our website. Don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media.

The post Kelly Starrett on Building the Mobility WOD Empire appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Training Young Athletes at Game Time Sports and Training with Drew Massey

Fri, 10/26/2018 - 13:27

Drew Massey is the Executive Director of Game Time Sports and Training, a premier sports and performance training facility based in Columbia, TN. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology in 2003 from Bethel College and in 2008, he obtained his master’s degree in Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention from California University in Pennsylvania. Following his college football career, he has served on the Bethel College coaching staff, was employed as the Wellness Director at the YMCA in Middle Tennessee and served as the Head Trainer at Empower Fitness.

Drew joins me today to share his long and winding career path through the fitness industry. He shares his thoughts and philosophy on training middle and high school athletes as well as his coaching techniques while working with male and female athletes. He also shares the typical workout and exercise routines he uses while working with young athletes and his most memorable career highlights as a physical fitness and preparation coach.

Learn the movement before you load it. But once you learn it – you better load it. – Drew Massey

This week on The Physical Preparation Podcast:
  • The driving force behind his passion for physical fitness and preparation.
  • How he found the inspiration to build a career in the fitness industry.
  • His training philosophy while working with middle and high school athletes.
  • How he addresses blowback and resistance to his youth training philosophy.
  • The importance of allowing young athletes to understand it’s okay to make mistakes in their fitness journey.
  • His experience and role while working with schools and school sports coaches.
  • Why he starts young athlete training sessions with foam-rolling exercises.
  • The strategy he uses when working with young athletes for the first time – and how the training progresses.
  • Conditioning exercises he uses in his training sessions with youth athletes.
  • Why he trains men and women the same but coaches them differently.
  • His most memorable career highlights as a physical fitness and preparation coach.
Drew Massey’s Life & Training Advice for Young Athletes:
  • Don’t overthink. If you’re stressed out about something, you’re more than likely overthinking it. Be confident in your ability to do what you love and you’re passionate about.
Resources Mentioned: Related Links: Connect with Drew Massey:

Improve Results with The Physical Preparation 101 Training System

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review. Connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or visit our website.

And don’t forget to share your favorite episodes with your friends on social media!

The post Training Young Athletes at Game Time Sports and Training with Drew Massey appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

4 Keystone Habits for Training, Nutrition, Recovery and Mindset

Fri, 10/12/2018 - 05:00

Whether you’re just starting your fitness journey or you’re an experienced enthusiast trying to create a program for yourself or your clients, developing healthy habits is critical to achieving your goals and seeing profound results in your fitness routine.

But, beyond merely going to the gym and working out, how can you develop healthy habits that enable you to maximize your performance and improve your results?

On today’s episode, I share the four keystone habits for training, fitness, nutrition, recovery, and mindset. I explain what a keystone habit is and how they impact other areas of your life beyond your health and fitness.

But enough from me – let’s do this!

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of what I covered on this week’s show:

  • What is a keystone habit and how they create a domino effect in your client’s and athlete’s fitness results.
  • How hiring other fitness trainers and coaches can impact your results while keeping you honest and accountable to your training.
  • How to find a great fitness trainer.
  • The benefits of hiring an online fitness coach.
  • Why meal preparation is critical for achieving your nutrition and fitness goals.
  • How certain flavors and additives impact your eating habits.
  • Actionable tips for improving your nutrition through meal preparation and planning.
  • What is a pre-sleep routine and how can help improve your sleep quality and fitness recovery?
  • Practical strategies to re-engage healthy pre-sleep routines.
  • Why your mindset is critical to fitness training success.
  • The difference between experimentation and shiny object syndrome.
  • The importance of setting a goal and sticking to it – then rotating.
  • The benefits of rotating your workout routines.
  • Actionable strategies for balancing rigidity and variability, rotating your routine, and improving your mindset.
Related Links Shameless Plug: Physical Preparation 101

Are you a fitness coach or trainer looking for ways to improve the results you deliver to your clients? Want to create consistently better training programs and learn the exact exercises and strategies to improve your clients’ and athletes’ performance?

The Physical Preparation 101 Training System unlocks the secrets to optimizing performance and improving movement through my unique, cutting-edge basic training philosophy.

In this series, you’ll learn:

  • The nuts and bolts of program design
  • The single-biggest issue you will see related to core exercises and breathing – and how to fix it!
  • How to train others to squat safely and effectively – in the first session
  • How to stop lower back pain in its tracks through deadlift progression
  • And much, much more!

You’ll also receive sample programs and templates to help you build great programs with AMAZING results – consistently.

Are you ready to take your fitness training and coaching programs to the next level? Visit PhysicalPreparation101.com to learn more and get started NOW!

Subscribe, Rate & Share!

Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, and SoundCloud and leave your honest review.

And we’d love to connect on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Thank you!

The post 4 Keystone Habits for Training, Nutrition, Recovery and Mindset appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

3 Loading Types You’ve Likely Never Heard Of

Mon, 10/08/2018 - 06:18

Note from MR: Chris Merritt is one of my favorite coaches when it comes to program design, and finding ways to be creative about your programs.

That’s why when he asked to write a guest post for the site on different loading types, I was all ears!

Needless to say, there’s some cool stuff in this article – and hopefully, something with a little “Monday Morning” value for you as well.

Here’s Chris….

As a coach that’s responsible for the program design of hundreds of people from all walks of life — 9-5ers, MMA fighters, elite tactical law enforcement, other coaches and personal trainers all over the world, young, old and everything in between — I’ve done my share of screaming in privacy over the stress of trying to put people in the best positions to be successful month in and month out.

I’ve found myself staring at a computer screen (on numerous occasions) attempting to write a new training phase for a member that’s been with me for 5+ years, thinking:

What else can I possibly throw at this person?!

Sure, I could mix things up and introduce new exercises, again, but is that what’s best?

New exercises likely means learning new skills, and time spent learning is time NOT spent training with appropriate intensities to elicit the specific responses that we’re after.

But what if there was a way we could train with appropriate sets, reps, and loads, AND, when appropriate, still add sensible variety to the process?

Taking this a step further, what if we made menus of readily available ways to accomplish this based around different training intentions like power, strength, hypertrophy, and conditioning?

If the intro didn’t make it obvious enough already, I’ll argue that we can.

I have, and I’d like to help you do the same.

And here’s the thing: You’re already using these things. I’m certain of that much.

But I’m willing to bet that you could be more organized in your approach, and that you might only be just scratching the surface when it comes to applying them. They just seem to be one of those often-forgotten training variables.

So let’s change that!

Now, what are these things?

Loading Types.

How do I know you’re already using them?

Because they’re in every single program, like, ever.

Ever program a goblet squat for 3 x 8? We call those straight sets.

Want to control the tempo of those squats? Maybe something like (3XX2)—a 3-second eccentric, no pause at the bottom, up fast, and then a 2-second pause at the top before another 3-second eccentric? You’ve just used tempo sets.

How many other ways can you think of to manipulate types of sets while minimally changing exercises?

Here’s what I’ve come up with:

While it’s not the end-all-be-all list, it’s a damn good start.

And for this post I figured we could introduce three of the lesser-known types:

  1. Ratchet Sets
  2. Count-Down Sets
  3. Breath Ladders
Ratchet Sets

Ratchet sets are useful in situations where you hate your client.

(Okay, I’m kidding – maybe just dislike).

They’re great for building time under tension beyond just slowing the tempo. Take an exercise and break it into as many parts as you’d like, and then ratchet through them—full eccentric, partial concentric, full eccentric, further on the concentric, full eccentric, etc., for as many parts as you desire to get back to the beginning:

Can you imagine doing these with get-ups?!

Roll to forearm, back down.

Roll to forearm, up to high bridge, back down.

Roll to forearm, up to high bridge, sweep to ½ kneeling, back down.

Roll to forearm, up to high bridge, sweep to ½ kneeling, stand, and finally all the way back down.

That’s one.

Up for more??

Count-Down Sets

Most often used in combination with another exercise done for straight sets, count-down sets are a great way to build some challenge into your conditioning.

Start with a given number of reps and do one less each subsequent round. Record your time to completion and aim to beat it in future sessions:

Breath Ladders

Another great tool for building time under tension, breath ladders can be applied in several ways.

They involve an increasing number of breaths after whatever they’re paired with.

Goblet squat, then one breath.

Another goblet squat, two breaths.

Another, three breaths.

Another, four breaths, … to whatever number you prescribe.

Personally, I like to throw these into complexes, chains, and rep ladders.

Holding the kettlebell rack position for extended periods of time can be challenging, right? So how about double kettlebell cleans in a rep + breath ladder:

Time and Place

There’s a time and place for applying different loading types, and arguably multiple for each type. Regardless of which one you’re looking to use in a given situation, make sure that it fits the “Why” of the overall goal.

Early on in your clients training age?

Straight sets and tempo can take them a long way. Don’t overwhelm them with variety in loading types for the sake of making a flashy program.

Is the goal to add power?

Straight sets, tempo, and complexes seem to work well.

Looking to increase strength?

Straight sets, tempo, clusters, + sets, partial reps, and weight ladders can work wonders.

Hypertrophy?

Straight sets, tempo, density, + sets, 1.5’s, ratchet sets, rep ladders, breath ladders, complexes, and chains could add sensible variety for years on end.

Conditioning?

Straight sets, density, completion, count-down/count-up sets, fixed-fixed, variable-fixed, fixed-variable, variable-variable, ladders, complexes, chains, and circuits will give you plenty to work with.

Summary

I’m sure you’ve got your own ideas coming to mind as you read this, so I’ll leave you with this:

Write them all down—names, descriptions, applications—and have them readily available for when you find yourself staring at a computer screen attempting to write a new training phase for a member that’s been with you for a while.

It will definitely help you the next time you’re thinking, what else can I possibly throw at this person?!

Want to learn about all the loading types mentioned above?

Grab a FREE copy of my e-book, “You Can’t Get Bored: Adding Variety to the Basics of Program Design,” here.

The post 3 Loading Types You’ve Likely Never Heard Of appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

Lachlan Wilmot on Preparation, Culture and the Art of Coaching

Fri, 10/05/2018 - 05:00

Lachlan Wilmot is in his second season as the Head of Athletic Performance for the Paramatta Eels of the National Rugby League. Prior to this assignment he spent time with the GWS Giants, AIS-AFL Academy and NSW/ACT AFL Academy.

In this show, Lachlan and I cover a ton of ground and discuss what it’s like to move up the food chain in the world of physical preparation. Whether it’s the value of hiring different personality types, why it’s important to stay open-minded with regards to your career, or his thoughts on dealing with adversity, there are all types of gems in this show.

But enough from me – let’s do this!

Show Outline

Here’s a brief overview of this week’s show:

  • Show Intro:
    • MR’s Weekly Update
    • RTS and IFAST Domination
    • MR’s Monologue: Thoughts on Sports, Failure and Losing
  • Q&A: 
    • Pre-season Achilles and ACL injuries in the NFL
  • Interview with Lachlan:
    • A quick updated on Lachlan, including what he’s been up to and what life is like in his new gig.
    • His thoughts on how you know if/when you’re ready to move from an assistant to head coaching position.
    • How to prepare yourself for the day when you move up the food chain.
    • This vision he had going into his first season, and the goals/measurables he wanted to keep tabs on.
    • The logistical issues he dealt with, including the one big thing he really wasn’t prepared for.
    • Lachlan’s goal for this year, and how he wants to continue building both his program and the culture of the Paramatta Eels.
    • If he could give a young physical preparation coach ONE PIECE of advice, what would it be?
    • A really fun lightning round where we talk about his most memorable experience of the past year, impactful books, speed exposure and hamstring injuries, getting engaged, and what’s next for Lachlan Wilmot.
Related Links

Connect with Lachlan 

Books Mentioned

Podcasts Mentioned

The post Lachlan Wilmot on Preparation, Culture and the Art of Coaching appeared first on Robertson Training Systems.

Categories: Feeds

5 Random Training Thoughts

Mon, 10/01/2018 - 08:30

I’m BAAAACCCCKKKKKK.

It’s been a little while since I wrote a new article, and while the podcast is still humming along, there’s something very humbling about writing that I have really missed.

As such, I’m going to jump back in today with a “Random” article, with the hope being that this will spur me into more articles and writing going forward.

So without any further ado, let’s jump right in!

1. It’s all about the angles.

I have talked about this numerous times now, but I’m constantly shocked at how many really good athletes don’t understand movement angles.

When I was doing more Combine/Pro-Day training last spring, this was readily apparent when it came to acceleration drills. The goal in acceleration is to create forces that are driving down and back, which can be a difficult concept for athletes to understand initially.

(And is often compounded if they don’t have the physical prerequisites to get there as well, but that’s a whole ‘nother can of worms.)

Now that I’m working with more off-season basketball players, this applies not only to linear acceleration but to lateral acceleration and deceleration as well.

When a basketball player is shuffling and needs to decelerate, I find many of these athletes shy away from aggressively getting their foot out wide.

However, getting their foot out wide is not only a great way to decelerate their body and slow momentum, but gives them the proper angle to re-accelerate back out of that cut.

When coaching your athletes, always look at and work to improve their angles. Even if this is the only thing you accomplish, chances are your athletes will move more effectively as a result.

2. Training is GPP.

As you know, I coach high-level athletes from a variety of sports.

So when it comes to my social media universe, I have coaches and followers that span the sports universe.

A while back I asked a very simple question – and got a question I really want to elaborate on.

What types of exercises/workouts do you like to focus on when training soccer players?

— Soc Takes (@SocTakes) May 30, 2017

Whether it’s football, basketball, or soccer, I’d like to think that the deeper down you look, the more you realize one thing:

We coach athletes first.

Not soccer players.

Not basketball players.

Not football players.

We coach athletes first.

Which is why when you look at many of my training programs, especially early-on, the programs might look very similar.

In very general terms, we’re going to follow the R7 template and cover all of our bases. We’re going to run fast, we’re going to jump high, we’re going to build strength, and we’re going to do some conditioning.

Focusing in a bit more, the R5, or resistance portion of the workout, is going to look eerily similar across sports.

We’re going to squat.

We’re going to hinge.

We’re going to push and pull.

And we’re going to include accessory movements that improve stability, control and movement variability.

So let me circle the wagons a bit here:

Much of the resistance training for my athletes looks the same regardless of sport. If possible, I want all of my athletes to be able to squat, hinge, push-up, lunge, pull-up, row, etc.

However, the subtle differences could include:

  • The load/intensity used. For instance a football player would almost always use more load than a basketball or soccer player.
  • The specific variation used. Most football players are comfortable under the bar, so they may get a training option that allows them to use more load. On the other hand, for other sports it may be more about offsetting the load and getting them to manage their center of gravity more effectively instead.
  • The assistance exercises used. While many don’t give too much thought to assistance exercises, I think this is the ideal time to work on movement efficiency and clean up any rate limiting steps with regards to performance.

On the flip side, the biggest differences you’ll see across sports are the movements involved, as well as the energy-production needs of the sport.

To be really general, a football player will probably be exposed to higher external loads, and energy system demands that are very alactic-aerobic in nature.

On the flip side, my soccer athletes will not be moving the same loads, but their capacity demands will be much greater in nature.

I’ll elaborate more on this later, but start thinking more about how your programs are similar (or different) across sports.

I think the thought process alone will be illuminating for you.

3. How Do You Build Physical Qualities When Movement Quality is Off?

This is a question I’ve struggled to reconcile in my monkey brain for a while now.

Let’s say you have an athlete in for a very short window of time. They don’t move particularly well, so loading them up and pushing the intensity of the workload in the weight room may not be in your best interest.

I’m a big believer that efficiency has to come first. If you can get an athlete to move air into the right places, if you can improve their movement variability, and if you can give them stability and control in the right areas, you’ll often see measurable performance improvements just by eliminating inefficiencies.

I saw this a lot with our off-season basketball guys. After all, many of them are going to go in and be asked to perform combine-style tests (vertical/approach jump, lane agility, etc.) so they want to perform well when they test.

So if you look at it from the athlete’s perspective, using a soft approach to training can be a tough sell, especially if they aren’t injured.

If they don’t hurt, in their mind, they’re ready to train and be pushed. So why is coach holding me back?

So this question keeps coming up in my thought process:

How can you build physical qualities (such as speed/strength/power), while simultaneously improving movement quality?

What I’ve tried to do here if maximize their strengths, while simultaneously minimizing their weaknesses within the program.

Let’s say a kid just really struggles to squat. Sure I could keep pushing the back squat or front squat variations, but it’s probably not going to help my cause.

Instead, I’m going to find an exercise like a goblet or 2-KB front squat where they literally can’t screw it up, and I’m going to push them as much as I can there.

Now here’s the cool thing about this…

Most athletes have some context as to how “strong” they are in the basic barbell lifts.

In other words, they “know” how much the front squat, back squat, etc.

But if I change the context of the lift/drill/exercise, now they’re less resistant to using what could be perceived as a lighter weight.

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve done this using the exact example above. An athlete comes in and thinks they’re a 225# front squatter, or a 315# back squatter.

I tell them we’re going to use a heavy goblet or 2-KB front squat to teach them to load their body effectively.

Then voila! If you’re coaching it up, and they’re moving it well, they don’t care as much about the total load.

Instead, they’re just focused on how it feels, and on doing it right.

If you struggle with athletes who are always chasing load, instead of fighting them head on and asking them to drop the weight, instead work to change the context.

I think you’ll like the results!

4. Make Them Feel Their Feet.

Another thing that I’m constantly shocked by is how poor many athletes are at feeling their feet.

Now I’m not talking about 5-10 years ago where we had everyone in Vibrams or walking around the facility barefoot.

No, I’m simply talking about getting an athlete to feel their whole foot – the toes, the heels, the instep/arch, and the outside of the foot.

Let’s start with a weight room example.

I remember when I was coming up and I told almost all of my athletes:

The weight room is the only sport where you want to be on your heels versus your toes.

And I came up with all kinds of analogies for this.

“Can you wiggle your toes in the bottom of an RDL?”

You know, stuff like that.

But over the years I’ve really come to reconsider that position.

When you exaggerate being on your heels, it almost immediately puts your spine in a bad position. Now you’re forced to lock your spine into extension to control its position.

Now when my athletes are squatting and deadlifting, I want them to feel the whole foot instead.

Below are two videos – one on the concept of “Tripod” foot, the second on how this applies to a specific exercise, like RDL’s.

When you can feel your whole foot in a squat or deadlift, this helps you “stack” your body top to bottom.

Furthermore, feeling your whole foot helps you maintain your center of gravity and balance, so that you can learn to be a pusher vs. a puller.

But this is just in the weight room!

When it comes to our speed and agility work, this is critical as well.

We had Lee Taft in last week, and he was describing this as well – how we get so obsessed with one area that we forget about the big picture.

News flash: When one area of your foot is carrying too much of the load, it’s going to limit your movement options.

For example, try sprinting straight ahead and then stopping/decelerating without finding your heels.

(I had an athlete this summer that tried for an entire session, and needless to say, it didn’t go well for him!)

The key, then, is to feel that whole foot, but to bias your weight shift to a specific area.

When lifting, you want to feel your whole foot, but the weight may be biased slightly to the heel.

If you’re doing linear speed work from a parallel stance, start in an athletic position with the whole foot in contact with the ground but the weight biased slightly to the forefoot.

And last but not least, if you’re doing lateral speed and agility work the starting position will have the feet wider than the hips. As such, feel the whole foot but be biased slightly towards the arch.

I guarantee if you can teach your athletes to feel their whole foot, it can be an absolute game changer – both in the gym, or on the field, court, or pitch.

5. The Sagittal Plane MUST Come First.

This last one is going to be a bit of review, but that doesn’t mean it’s not important.

It’s like the thing you learn in the first week of school, but it’s so important, you need to remember it all the way until that cumulative test you take during finals week.

Quite simply, you must learn to control the sagittal plane first.

I still seeing athletes doing all this cool work in the frontal and transverse planes, yet it’s obvious they have no control over their sagittal plane.

Work to get that pelvis as level as you can front to back first.

Work to neutralize that thorax and get the air flowing first.

When you do this, so many little things come around.

You tend to get hip extension back.

You tend to get hip rotation back.

And lo-and-behold, you tend to get shoulder rotation back as well.

(This is something I’m sure Eric will be talking about at his Shoulder Seminar here in Indianapolis in November. If you’re in the area, I’d highly recommend signing up!)

Now with that being said, here’s the bad news:

There’s not one “thing” that’s magically going to fix this.

It’s not one targeted breathing exercise or reset.

It’s not one specific stretch.

And it’s not simply moving from back squats to front squats.

If you want to unlock movement quality and truly take your athleticism to the next level, everything in your program needs to addressing controlling the sagittal plane first.

I’ll probably do a more thorough write-up on this in the future, but if you want a bit more insight, here’s a little side reading for ya: Sagittal Plane First.

Summary

All righty friends, that does it for me.

Thanks so much for reading and have a great day!

All the best,
MR

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